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NEW! Sharpie Cheeseburger Limited Edition Collection

The groundhog didn’t exactly stick to his promise of Spring being right around the corner so we are putting matters into our own hands. And since there’s nothing like a good barbecue to get you in the mood for warm weather, we are uncapping a NEW limited edition collection that will leave you hungry for more!

Introducing the NEW Sharpie Cheeseburger Limited Edition Collection! Available in the month of April only get all five Cheeseburger-inspired colors – Catsup Red, Cheddar Orange, Buns Beige, Beefy Brown & Pickle Green – to uncap an endless amount of creativity.

That’s not all! When you buy the Sharpie Cheeseburger Limited Edition Collection we’ll also throw in a FREE side of fries – aka Two Pack Taters.

So what are you waiting for? Click HERE to get ‘em while they’re hot!

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NEW! Cheeseburger Sharpie Collection

Gotcha! Did you really think we would name a marker color “Beefy Brown”?!

As much as we love a good cheeseburger, there just isn’t enough room for this collection in the Sharpie vault. For now…

Have an idea for a limited edition Sharpie collection? Let us know in the comment section below or tweet your ideas to @Sharpie!

Happy April Fools’ Day!

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Subway Art Starts with Sharpie

Enrico Miguel Thomas

You know those wildly difficult-to-fold pieces of paper called maps?  Those oversized contraptions soon to go the way of GPS?  Well they’ve found new purpose. Thanks to Enrico Miguel Thomas, subway maps now have soul.

Enrico is a subway map artist.  He uses Sharpie markers to create magnificent works of art on subway maps.

Based in Brooklyn, Enrico got his start as a map artist after he discovered that Sharpie markers were the perfect medium to express his urban style. Using subway maps as his primary canvas, Enrico created a style — a genre, even – all his own.  Subway maps became the “drawing paper” that allowed him to express his unique perspective, including the incredible and inspiring views of New York City that capture his imagination.

Take a minute to get to know Enrico in our interview below — he won’t disappoint — and who knows, maybe you’ll find your way to a one-of-a-kind canvas that inspires you.

The Apple Store

Tell me about yourself. Where are you from? What are your interests, likes, dislikes? Pet Peeves welcome too. 

My name is Enrico Miguel Thomas and I was born in Los Angeles, California. I love to draw and always have. The legendary comic book artist, Stan Lee was one of my first artist role models. I used to constantly study how he drew his super heroes .

A good day for me is one hundred push-ups first thing in the morning, followed by a bottle of water and then off to my favorite cafe in Brooklyn, Le Petit, for some apple pie with an iced chai tea latte for breakfast. I am also a film fanatic and a huge X-Men fan and some day I would love to have a part in a cool action film! I am usually always a positive person and can’t stand when people don’t at least try to see the glass as half full instead of half empty. I admire people who have persevered through the greatest odds and keep going anyway!

What is inspires you to Uncap What’s Inside?

I first started using Sharpie markers in my second year at Pratt Institute. As a drawing major, I found Sharpie markers to be so easy to work with as a drawing tool. They were so compatible with virtually every drawing surface I tried whether it was paper, wood, or even foam core. After I graduated, I stuck with them and have always insisted on using them. While at Pratt and afterwards, I began to draw lots of architecture and nothing compared to the black Sharpie Marker! They always had such a smooth feel on the paper’s surface.

Eventually, I would try using a subway map as drawing paper and Sharpie markers were perfect for this new drawing surface! The beautiful architecture in New York City and the cool subway trains and stations inspired me to go out and draw. I love the challenge of creating the illusion of a three dimensional space on a two dimensional drawing surface.

Also, my childhood was very difficult so art has always been a refuge for me and always gave me a great feeling of accomplishment. It gives me a new identity as an artist instead of someone who had a difficult early life.

HSBC Bank

How do you use Sharpie markers in your work?

In my work, Sharpie markers are used in a way that I think is a metaphor for a part of my personality, which is that of a fighter and someone who perseveres. I can take a package of Sharpie markers and create a colorful drawing that looks as though it was created with the most expensive art materials. e.g. oil paints, acrylic paints, etc. For example the Sharpie Silver Metallic marker works perfectly for the color of the subway cars that I draw on the subway maps. The bottom line for me is that it doesn’t matter how much you have without. Instead, it is what is within that matters. If the will power is there you can create with anything. This is what “Uncap what’s inside” means to me.

How would you describe your style? 

My style is all about speed. The speed of New York City. I love to draw quickly so my style is definitely illustrative and architectural but can also be classified as fine art.

How did you get started?

I started drawing at the age of eight. I remember being in an art class when I was about thirteen and the teacher would say, “Enrico it is time to go”, but I would want to stay and finish my drawing because I loved art so much. I continued to take art in high school and college and always received encouragement to keep doing it from family and teachers alike.

You have really put a new spin on “following the map” – tell us the story behind using subway maps as your “canvas.”

I started using subway maps because I wanted to try a new challenge. Life without challenges is pretty stale so I gave it a go even though I wasn’t sure if I would like the result. To my surprise, using subway maps as drawing paper, added the additional challenge of working with the colors already present on the map. It wasn’t always easy collaborating with the map but I was determined to make it work. This is the message that I would like my art to send out to the world. In life you have to keep trying until you are happy with yourself. You have to refuse to give up!

The city really seems to inspire you and your art; do you have a favorite subject or a place in the Big Apple where you find inspiration?

My favorite place in the city, by far, is New York City’s upper west side at 72nd Street. There is a huge exterior subway station there with a smaller one behind it and in the background, beautiful tall buildings that provide the perfect backdrop for the negative space of the drawing. I have always found this space to be architecturally fascinating.

Your art has a really cool “sketch” effect that I can imagine is hard to create with a permanent marker! Do you free-hand your work or plan them out first? 

I definitely free-hand all of my drawings. It is just a gift that I am very thankful to have and it has been a wonderful refuge for me all my life.

The New York Philharmonic

Franklin Street Station

How do you decide what you want to tackle next, slash can you tell us what you ARE working on next?

I basically just walk around until something that I find beautiful “catches my eye.” And then watch out because Enrico Miguel Thomas goes to work on the spot and basically doesn’t leave till the drawing is complete – just like I did in Junior High School! There was this one time about two months ago, when I was working on two interior watercolors of the New York City 72nd Street Station and my work session didn’t end until about 5am! Right now I am working on a subway map drawing of the New York City Freedom Towers that are actually still under construction.

Do you have a soft spot for one of your designs in particular?

I definitely have drawings that are favorites. I love my 72nd Street drawings and my Flatiron building drawings.

72nd St on Subway Map

Best part of your “day job”?

I decided after Pratt Institute, to give my life to my art so it is all I currently do. I believe that when you make up your mind to do something nothing is impossible. “As a man thinketh, so is he.” – James Allen

If you could have one super power what would it be and why?

To fly so I could travel for free. First stop…Paris!

If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who and why?

Denzel Washington because I think his work is amazing!

Finally, what are you just JAZZED about for 2012 (trends, upcoming projects, personal life)?

In 2012, I am really looking to branch out even more as far as additional exhibitions of my work. I am also going to study more acting. Studied some already about five years ago at H.B. Studios here in New York City. Also looking into doing art work in Amsterdam and Paris.

Check back to see what Enrico Starts next and be sure to follow him on Twitter @NYCSubwayArtist for daily updates.

You can read more about Enrico here:

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NEW! Sharpie Highlighter Gels with Students

…No, not the kind of gel you see on the Jersey Shore. We’re talking the bright and colorful fluorescent gel that’s perfect for highlighting notes, text and more!

Now this is a back-to-school product worth highlighting. The Sharpie Gel Highlighter promises to last long, resist smearing, and never dry out, even if left uncapped (eliminates the oops factor). It’s perfect for use on all paper surfaces, including glossy and thin papers.  It also resists smearing on pen, marker and ink-jet printouts — and is equally as fun to write, doodle and draw with.  Give it a swipe!  Your highlighting life will never be the same ; )

Uncap and give the highlighter a twist to advance the gel stick and you’re set.  It even highlights glossy magazines…wait… magazines??? I’ve never highlighted a magazine before. Excuse me while I test this out…

[tick tock...tick tock...]

I’m back! IT WORKS! Take a look at what I did to the horoscope section of the Feb issue of Teen Vogue!

The Sharpie Gel Highlighter is available wherever office products are sold in orange, yellow, pink, blue and green.  Now the only problem is deciding which color to use, when, on what surface because I’m a color-coded kinda kid!! 

 So what do you think?!

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NEW! Stained by Sharpie Fabric Markers

Just like you, the creative minds behind Sharpie are movers and shakers, always seeking to express themselves in new & creative ways. Today, extending the possibilities even further, Sharpie encourages you to evoke self-expression & let your imaginations run wild with the NEW! Stained by Sharpie fabric markers!

Think For Yourself. Ink For Yourself.

The NEW Stained by Sharpie marker line brings new life to fabric markers! Boasting a versatile brush tip, a new fade-resistant ink developed for optimal performance on most fabric surfaces and 8 bright, bold colors perfect for staining your stuff, the Stained by Sharpie marker is perfect for inking creatively on most all of your fabric surfaces.

Like all of our Sharpie products, Stained by Sharpie packs a color punch that can turn white into bright with just the brush of a marker. Need some ideas? Our new fabric markers are great for dreaming big on denim, adding pep to the step of your sneakers & tired tees, fancifying  furniture, embellishing backpacks, purses and more!

Each pack of Stained by Sharpie markers comes equipped with a brief lesson on “Stained 101.” Here’s a rundown of some things you’ll learn for the guide:

  • Ignore design rules you’ve had before and ink freely - Stain the way YOU want. 
  • Mistake? What mistake?! Throw some layers over it and no one will know the difference.
  • Drawing people is hard! When in doubt – stick it out.  Stick people are people too!
  • Anything you can imagine can be drawn. Break it down shape-by-shape.
  • Experiment with lettering – graffiti, bubble, script and more!
  • With over 600 bazillion things in the world inspiration is everywhere!
  • Care for your markers like you’d care for anything you love. Store them horizontally and with the cap on to keep that relationship alive and well. 

Also available is the New Stained by Sharpie Drawstring Bag! 

Offering the perfect surface to ink for yourself, this drawstring bag instantly becomes your own with the brush of a marker. Get creative and transform this blank canvas into your own personal billboard! (Here’s an example of the drawstring bag that we stained.) The drawstring bag is sold blank, plain white ready for you to customize with your own attitude and design, along with a set of Stained by Sharpie fabric markers and the “101 guide.”

Drop by Sharpie.com to learn more about Stained by Sharpie markers and get your set today!

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Inktern Interview with Jessica Hill

We are lucky to have Caitlin Ursini join our team as our summer “inktern.” Looking to gain first-hand knowledge on what it takes to build and run a brand, we’re putting Caitlin to work across several projects to give her the chance to experience several parts of our brands. Caitlin is currently a junior at Indiana University, studying to earn her degree in journalism with a minor in history and marketing. She loves Chicago sports, country music and I quote, “I enjoy telling my co-workers about my weird habits.” Caitlin’s favorite Sharpie is a custom Blackhawks Stanley Cup marker and in case you were wondering, the best thing she’s ever done was attending Wimbledon last summer.

One of Caitlin’s projects is to conduct interviews with various Sharpie artists to feature on the blog. One of the firsts: Jessica Hill.

Art: Anytime. Anywhere.

For years Jessica Hill kept work under her bed, in her closets, in the family’s shed, but not anymore. Now it’s on her blog, in charity auctions, for sale at galleries and even on TV. Each of her pieces has dozens of different figures and creatures within it. They are her creations, but it is everyone else’s interpretations that make these unique creatures in her drawings what they are.

Today’s featured artist may live a normal life as a graphic designer in Nashville, TN., but there is way more to it than a good cup of coffee and a great husband. Jessica spends her days outside of work creating art and designs on just about anything and everything she can find with her Sharpie Paint Markers.

Jessica has been at this for a long time. Since she was a kid, her parents and teachers encouraged her to creative outlets.  Clearly all the art, music and creative writing classes paid off. Her unconventional art work features characters and figures that take on a life of their own. Each one is individual and each has potential to have its own meaning to the audience. For Jessica though it isn’t always what she draws, but where. Old calendars, chairs, used canvases, you name it Jessica will find a way to use it for her work. Using different materials makes the sky the limit. It helps Jessica get out her urge to create. When you are willing to use anything as your canvas there is nothing to hold you back.

Here are some other things that Jessica had to say:

Personal Style: I think my personal style is just fun and amusing, really. I don’t think about it too much. My work is usually associated with “street art”, which is cool with me. However, the word “obsessed” might describe my personal style, too. I tend to paint things over and over again. I draw all the lines freehand. I have to paint layers and layers of the same color to get a flat, bright image.

Where did these creatures come from: It just sort of evolved over time. Contrary to what some might think, I actually can draw more traditionally, but I always loved street art and skateboard designs. I did silk screening for a while and I loved the bright, flat colors. Also, being a graphic designer, I tend to like minimal things. But I am always thinking about color and layout, too. And again, I just keep myself amused. I think that’s also a large part of it. As for the monsters having one big eye and one little eye… I don’t know why I do that. I just like how it looks.  

What are these guys’ personalities: I have never given any character a specific personality, but other people do. People are always naming them or telling me how they see them. I think that’s part of the fun for me… I just make characters that I personally find amusing. I like that they seem to appeal to a wide range of people from adults to kids.

What did you feel when you got these guys on TV: It was very flattering and slightly embarrassing. I am always proud of my work, but I can feel my cheeks getting red whenever I get a little bit of the spotlight. Honestly, it’s just amazing to me how kind people have been and how much they’ve embraced my work. It’s just amazing and I can’t tell you how much I appreciate it.

Why Sharpie: Well, I found that Sharpie markers let me draw on pretty much any surface. Also, I don’t have to worry about anything dripping, like I would with paint. All my characters have a black outline on them and I found that with Sharpie markers I have a lot more control over those lines. I don’t have to worry about dipping the brush in more paint and I know I can use it on any surface and it won’t chip or flake away when it’s finished. They are just awesome to use and they have such a wide range of sizes, so it just makes the pieces really look polished in the end.                                                                                                                                                                                      

Favorite Sharpie: Right now I am loving the Sharpie Paint Markers. They give me really smooth lines and consistent black ink. It sounds a little silly, but lots of markers don’t always give you a smooth, dark line. They lose ink along the way and that can be frustrating. The Sharpie paint marker has served me well. I also use the extra fine markers for detail work, which is great. I would be lost without them.

Are you an environmentalist or is all this supplies another creative outlet: I would love to say that I am an environmentalist, but it was really kind of accidental. Canvas can be expensive and you don’t always have access to one when you get an idea that you want to work on right away. So I started using things I had around the house and I liked how the different materials gave you different results. They all hold paint or ink differently, and I like that. Plus, sometimes I don’t have a lot of time to work on a project but I want to do some doodles. I will just grab magazines or old calendars and doodle for a while. It’s a really fun outlet for me and I find it really relaxing. 

What’s your favorite recycled piece: It’s so hard for me to say… I really enjoyed filling in my old calendar with doodles. I also did a coffee can label for a local coffee shop here in Nashville and that was actually done on the back of a cereal box. I enjoyed that one!
My husband also brings home scraps pieces of wood for me that he will trim down into little squares and I can’t get enough of them!

Most spontaneous piece you’ve ever created: I think that being able to use what’s around does allow me to get my ideas out quickly. Sometimes I get the urge to draw all over photos that my friends will post on-line or email me. It’s like this urge that I just can’t resist and I have to deface it for some reason! It seems I have a problem with impulse control at times… so lots of the things I make are spontaneous. One day I started drawing my favorites movies on scraps of cardboard. Before I knew it, I had a whole pile of them!

Why do you think it’s important to give back: You know, I just think I am so lucky that people like my work. I don’t have a ton of money and I don’t have a lot of other skills. I am glad I can pitch in this way and help out some good causes. It’s just win-win. My favorite experience with volunteering is just meeting so many great people! I’ve met so many wonderful people through charity events. I also get to team up with other local artists and it’s nice to have a sense of community with all of them. It’s not competitive and I really enjoy that.

What’s on your to-do list right now: Well, I have a show coming up in June that I am working on and some commission work to do after that. There is a festival in August that I have work in and I am booked for another show in December. I try not to get too much on my plate so I don’t get overwhelmed, but I stay busy!

If there was one place your art could take you, think DREAM job, where would it be: I gotta say, I LOVE my current job. It’s challenging and creative and I work with great people. I don’t know what my dream job would be, honestly. I just thank my lucky stars that I can make a living doing what I love. I know that there are lots of people who are not as lucky. I don’t know what else I would do if I wasn’t doing creative work. My mind couldn’t do anything else

If you’re interested in Jessica’s work you can view her blog or tweet at her @jessicahillart

Tweet Caitlin at @Inktern and be sure to check out her Inktern blog.

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Good Bot, Bad Bot

They say one day robots will take over the world… But who are they anyway? And why are they teeing up robots as bad guys? What if they were good? What if robots didn’t necessarily take over the world, but were more of our buddies? What if they brought joy, followed you around giving compliments on say, your pants or a school project? What if robots offered great advice or boosted your confidence? What if…

Thanks to today’s featured artist, that “what if” just turned into “what is.” Addicted to Sharpie Oil-Based Paint markers, Gary Hirsch has assembled an army of androids that love, caffeinate, knit, stop time, even give you permission to be a bit callous now and then.

Hirsch, creator of Joy Bots took time to answer our Sharpie Q&A. Warning, it’s a bit lengthy but a guaranteed good read!

Featured Sharpie Artist: Gary Hirsch

Tell me about yourself!  Where are you from? Interests? Likes? Dislikes? Pet Peeves? My life has been made up of a series of collisions: I am an actor (improviser) and a business consultant/facilitator, and a painter, and a Dad, and a wanna-be marine biologist. I collide all of them in various ways…it’s never a dull moment. I found (really co-founded) a mini-micro-national, creative consultancy called On Your Feet. We use highly experiential methods from the world of improvisation, and elsewhere, to help organizations communicate, create and relate—all while having a ridiculously good time. Before On Your Feet I was an improv performer (still am), painter (still am), and t-shirt artist (nope gave that one up).

I am best know in my adopted hometown of Portland, Oregon (I am an ex- Cleveland Heights, Ohio guy) for a large public art commission that the city asked me to create in 1996; it’s called Upstream Downtown- eighteen giant aluminum fish that hang from the open spaces of one of Portland’s ugliest parking garages, hopefully the fish make it a little more beautiful.

Upstream Downtown

Likes: The Ali G Show, Peach Tazo, Baba Ganoush, Radio Lab, The Moth, A Sunday night show of AsssCat performed a The Upright Citizen’s Brigade in NYC or L.A., my son’s band Meet Your Monster, and I am a sucker for the video series “Where the Hell is Matt”, the guy that dances seemingly in every country on the planet (my daughter rolls her eyes whenever I watch it because I inevitably cry every time and whisper things like “ yes….this gives me hope….”). 

Peeves: Anything passive aggressive. 

How did you get started as an artist?   When I was growing up I had a lot of nightmares. You know, your basic, run of the mill nightmares- giant hands swooping down from the attic, grabbing you out of bed and swallowing you whole, where he would land in a stomach that was really a grave yard populated by zombies, yeah those kind of nightmares…On these nights when I couldn’t sleep I would sit with my father in the kitchen and draw the monsters from his nightmares. We would stay up for hours and my Dad would help me name these creatures (My parents saved all of these doodles, I still think they are some of my best work). Once during a late night doodling session my father leaned over and said, “You know, if you can create them, then you can also erase them.” So I would draw and erase and after a while the nightmares would come a bit less frequently.  I never stopped doodling since. 

 

How would you describe your personal style? I am a doodler at heart. I must doodle to survive, period. This got me into a lot of trouble in school, because teachers always thought I wasn’t paying attention when I was scribbling in the margins of my notebook. But I was, I really was Mrs. White! Years later I saw an article that found that some people listen better when they are doodling….yes! Vindicated! 

Where do you draw inspiration from?  There is an army of artists that I am in awe of: Goya, Haring, Beckman, Dubuffet, Scharf, Baseman. Last year, I attended Tim Burton’s visual art exhibition at the MOMA and that was enough to keep my inspiration gas tank easily full these past 7 months. The thing that all of these masters of their craft have in common is that their work is all about stories. I am addicted to stories. I dive deeply into the world of story and narrative, mostly through my experiences as an improv theater performer. What keeps interesting me is the idea of incomplete story…of starting something and inviting the audience to finish it, to co-create it with me. Sure, I have something in mind when I paint…..but so do you when you look at the painting. I love that a single piece of stimulus can ignite a flood of ideas and stories. 

A-Ten-Hut!

How do you use Sharpie markers in your work?  Discovering the Sharpie Oil-Based Paint Marker was a revelation, really (and I am not just saying that because you are Sharpie, that would very brown nosey)! It was kind of like a divine intervention from the art gods. I needed something with vivid color, fast drying that could work on a domino….viola, prayers answered! 

Favorite Sharpie. Why? I’m currently having a love affair with Sharpie Extra-Fine Oil-Based Paint Markers. Beautiful, consistent line, allows me to get small and tight with details, dries amazingly fast, and sticks to everything….cue the music I feel an endorsement coming on! 

What is it about robots that you love so much?  I had this idea about 5 years ago: Imagine that you had an imaginary robot that followed you around all day and gave you outrageous compliments. It was a fun idea to imagine, so I included it in an illustrated journal that we made for our On Your Feet clients and gave them out when we were running innovation and creativity sessions. This image of a robot that follows you around giving you compliments keep haunting me…I mean seriously, how cool would that be? It would be invisible and only you would know it was there and it would say things to you like “ Nice pants” or “That was a smart thing to do” or “You made the right choice.”  So this year, I thought, “Let’s make the robots real” and after playing with several surfaces, we stumbled on the domino. Now instead of an invisible robot you have a small pocket robot.   

Bundle of Bots

What does one do with an army of robots? What do the robots do for me? This tiny robot army is programmed to bring you joy! Each Joy Bot is hand-painted, on-of-a-kind pocket friend. 

To activate simply:

  1. Allow your robot to get to know you by placing him on your desk, kitchen counter or cubicle or wherever you spend the most amount of time.
  2. Wait until he notices something about you (it won’t take long) and then listen while he tells* you how wonderful you are, or how much he loves you, or how brave you have been, etc. (what he says depends on the type of robot you have selected). (see attached image of a sample of the operating instructions that come with every Joy Bot)
  3. Take him with you everywhere you go for the maximum domino effect.

* The robots don’t really talk (’cause they’re painted dominoes) but you can imagine that they do. 

Pop Quiz! What Bot is this?

There are 10 types of Joy Bots:

  • Love Bot: Programmed To Love You
  • Joy Bot: Programmed to Make You Feel Great
  • Brave Bot: Programed To Give Your Confidence a Jolt
  • Listening Bot: Programmed To Listen To You, Unconditionally
  • Yes Bot: Programmed To Say “Yes” To Anything You Say
  • Mean Bot: Programmed to Give You Permission To Be a little petty, mean, or whiny
  • Caffeine Bot: Programmed To Wake You Up
  • Knitting Bot: Programmed To Make You a Knitting Sensation
  • Time Bot: Programmed to Stop Time (so you can re-live great moments or erase bad moments)
  • Advice Bot: Gives you Outrageously Useful Advice

What is your favorite bot? I’m a big fan of The Time Bot. It stops time so you can go back and erase a stupid mistake or relive a wonderful moment. A very useful ability, I would say. 

Time Bots

What is the Caffeine Bot’s favorite kind of caffeine?  No surprise, it’s coffee. I made them to accompany an exhibition of paintings that I was having in my neighborhood at a local coffee shop. I imagined that having a Caffeine Bot would help me reduce my coffee consumption because they are programmed to Wake You Up. (no such luck, still pouring down the coffee.) 

Caffeine Bots

If your Joy Bots had a theme song what would it be?  No brainer….Robot Parade, by They Might Be Giants, one of my kid’s favorite songs! Also love Birdhouse In The Soul by TMBG as well, either work. 

Why is the Mean Bot so mean?! He’s there to give you permission to be a little mean, or petty, or “snivelly”…S ometimes we just have to vent…The Mean Bot  lets you express the darker side, without shame. 

Mean Bots

How do you come up with all of the robots? It’s all about the story they tell the viewer. I want to make Bots that can give you advice, tell you how wonderful you are, or stop. The idea is that they all have to help you have a conversation with yourself. Of course, the Bots don’t actually talk but still people have told me things like, “My Bot just encouraged me to take risk” or “I felt great today because my Bot told me to how nice and helpful I am to my business partner.” I had one woman contact me for a set of Brave Bots for her family to help them who with coping with the recent death of a loved one. Are these people crazy? Of course not, they are just realizing something about themselves. The Bots don’t actually talk, but something about them allows people to imagine that they do, and somehow gives voice to a few, small and hopefully wonderful tid-bits about themselves. 

What’s in the future for Joy Bots?  Not sure, they really do have a life of their own. I don’t have a ton of time to make them right now because I’m so busy with my consulting work, so any painting time is a luxury and a treat. I love making small batches of limited editions when I get spare moments. I have been approached to mass produce them for the gift market, but I can’t see doing that, it is such a joy to strap on my head phones with a podcast from Radio Lab, or The Moth, listen to a wonderful story. Let my mind wander, and slowly paint, not knowing what will emerge until the final stroke of the pen. I will just keep making them, and showing them to whoever is interested and let the rest work itself out. 

Knit Bots Listening Bots

Do you have any advice for other artists? Oy, I hate questions like this because it assumes I know WTF I am doing. I guess I would say what I say to my 16 year old son who is trying to break into the music industry and that is, Make the call. If someone says “you should call me,” DO IT. If something happens don’t ponder if it is “good” or “bad,” ask yourself “What can I do with this?” This is ingrained in me from all of my improv work. Improvisers are masters at using what they have and turning nothing into something. I see opportunity in lots of things; I would encourage other artists to turn down the dial on their own self judgment, notice more around them and use it as an opportunity. 

How can I get a bot? Right now I sell at few galleries across the country and on my art site, www.doodlehouse.com. You can also go directly to my Etsy site: http://www.etsy.com/shop/GaryHirschartshop 

Anything I didn’t ask that you would like to add? Sure, but this interview is way too long as it is. I’m an extravert and have to talk to think, so thanks for letting me blab!

Thanks again to Gary for the EXCELLENT interview! Be sure to check out the Joy Boy website and build your own BOT army!

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Sharpie Squad Member on E! News

Sharpie Squad member, Erica Domesek of P.S. -I Made This… was featured on E! News, Wednesday, May 18th! E!’s Cat Sadler reports how our squad member creates runway inspired fashions, accesories and more at an affordable cost using every day items.

In the news segment, Domesek demonstrates how to DIY a beaded statement necklace,  a fashionable clutch for your iPad using colors from Prada’s runway collection and a Vera Wang inspired belt that doubles as a headband.  

Watch Erica’s E! segment, “Crafty Transformations” below:

Here are a few of Erica’s projects using Sharpie markers: Kate Spade event, Ready Made magazine

You can also find more Sharpie-made projects in Erica’s new book, P.S. -I Made This… 

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Glamour’s Secret Stash

Secret's out! Glamour uses Sharpie for scuffs too!

Glamour Magazine’s June issue features Sharpie markers as a must-have secret style weapon to always keep at your desk. Check out what else is in Glamour’s arsenal of must-have items and why you need them at Glamour.com. While you’re online, order up some Sharpie markers to stash at your desk!

Share what some of your must-have items are for work or school - Leave your comment below!