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JESS3 Strikes Black

Black and white mural by JESS3 made w/ Sharpie!

At SXSW, I discovered a new designer, JESS3. I kept finding different creative designs posted all over Austin which made me want to find out more about the person behind such detail. I was able to track down the culprit via twitter and found that he too has a love for Sharpie! Above is a picture of a mural that @JESS3 tweeted me, which was made with black Sharpie markers.

JESS3 is a creative agency, specializing in visual data, founded by Jesse Thomas. See more of JESS3 at http://jess3.com/.

You should follow his tweets too: @JESS3 . While you’re at it, check ‘em out on your favorite book of faces.

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Hang on Your Every Word

I saw this wall display at a stationery store in Chicago recently.  Here we have a collection of quotes and sayings written down by different people. The simplicity of this might be the best part. What I found so appealing were the various styles of penmanship and the small details on each card, which give the display personality and character.

*apologies for the photo quality, camera phone was acting up.

You can do this by purchasing blank notecards and having friends, family, coworkers, etc.. write down their favorite quotes and sayings with Sharpie markers. Clip the cards onto a weighted wire and hang on your wall.

This would be a fun activity for a host/hostess to offer party-goers at the next soiree.

What quotes would you write down?
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Merge presents Reply All

Sharpie was the chosen weapon of creativity at the most recent Merge party, called Reply All.  On December 10th, the Chicago design community gathered to celebrate creativity and passion at a local Chi-town hot spot, Evil Olive. Organized by Mig Reyes, Kyle Stewart and a team of AIGA Chicago members, the goal of Reply All was to connect the creative community and of course, have fun.

The event had an all-star lineup of five guest speakers, local Chicago DJs kept the dance floor moving and art auctions were held through out the night with proceeds going to Reason to Give. The walls of the venue were covered with white paper and blank posters with more Sharpie markers far and wide, luring the creative minds to draw, write, scribble and sketch. Even our friends from The Hello Project were present with a dedicated area for creating those favorite 3×3 ‘Hellos’. Find out exactly who was in attendance, speakers, DJ’s, sponsors and more at LetsMerge.

Big shout outs go to the list of sponsors and artists who helped make the event possible and of course two incredibly talented photographers, Kyle LaMere of IshootRockstars and Colin Beckett who captured Reply All in all its glory (…and here are some of them!)

photo by Colin Beckett

photo by Colin Beckett

photo by Colin Beckett

photo by Colin Beckett

by Kyle LaMere of IshootRockstars (you might recognize a few familiar faces in the top row)

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Doodle Contest w/ Laura Kelly & Coffeesmiths

This Fall, Sharpie Squad member Laura Kelly challenged Cedar Rapids residents to uncap their creativity at Coffeesmiths Cafe & Drive Thru.  The rules were simple: Participants headed to Coffeesmiths to pick up a plain white Coffeesmiths cup to be designed & customized using Sharpie markers.

Laura Kelly, Coffeesmiths, & Sharpie awarded prizes to the winners in four categories:

  1. Professional Artist
    $100 in Sharpie Product. $100 Laura Kelly Stationery. $20 Coffeesmiths Gift Certificate
  2. Big People (Ages 13 and up)
    $100 in Sharpie Product. $100 Laura Kelly Stationery. $20 Coffeesmiths Gift Certificate
  3. Little People (Ages 0-12)
    $100 in Sharpie Product. $100 Laura Kelly Stationery. $10 Coffeesmiths Gift Certificate
  4. School
    $250 in Sharpie Product, 100 memo pads designed by Laura Kelly (Value $600)
    and Coffee of Cocoa for Staff meeting (160 oz Box)

The results…

Artist Winner

Big Kid Winner

Little Kid Winner

School Winner

Other entries…

 

Aritist Entries

Big Kid Entries

Little Kid entries

School Entries

From the Baristas!

Want to see more coffee cup entries? There are TONS more to check out on Coffeesmiths’ Facebook album.

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Create While You Hydrate

Fresh beats, cool drinks and urban art -  Sounds like paradise to me!  Now, where does one find such an oasis….

Our friends at Urbane Apartments coordinated an area of R&R for attendees of Michigan’s Arts Beats & Eats fest over Labor Day Weekend.  Sharpie hopped on board with the great people over at vitaminwater to put this event into action.  Transforming one of Urbane Apartments’ into, what was known as a ”Hydration Gallery,” fest-goers were invited into a “chic lounge atmosphere” to cool off, rehydrate with delicious vitaminwater and create works of art with Sharpie Markers on easels that were set up around the lounge, all the while enjoying tunes provided by  Livio Radio

Here are some pictures from the Hydration Gallery.  If you missed out, not to worry, it looks like the event was such a success that these Hydration Galleries may just pop up at a fest near you!

One more thing! 

A HUGE thanks to Josh Bartlett and Stephen Roginson from Glaceau for the generous supply of vitaminwater!  You would not believe how quickly these disappeared.  I guess doodling all day can really make one quite thirsty!

Thank you!

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Sharpie Squad Guest Blogger: Tali Buchler

Tali Buchler brings something fresh to the Sharpie blog today as she demonstrates her favorite way to uncap directly onto and into the pages of the encyclopedia. 

The Sharpie Squad’s own Tali Buchler, creative genius behind Growing Up Creative, adds her own twist to the powerhouse of all publications- the collection of text containing every piece of information one could want/need to know.  Clearly though, Tali has found something that the editors have left out and she intends to correct them… 

A new reason to open an encyclopedia…

Used objects and discarded items (or what some may call -trash), always spark my imagination. Transforming an object – giving it a new life and purpose is something I like to do. In the past, I have used discarded magazines in designing a temporary space for a fashion show in an installation called – Read. 

My new “thing” is collecting encyclopedia books that people have been throwing away.  I started folding the books and turning them into sculptural objects.  I’m not sure where this will end, still a work in progress…

In my blogs I have started a series of tutorials called “Eco kids craft” where I use design ideas and craft techniques to encourage recycling creativity and creating with “whatever you have”.

Recently, I had my family over (my brother calls it/ us “the tribe”); a total of 8 kids – enough to start a preschool!  It was so hot that day, we couldn’t go outside. After a while, I started hearing the “I am bored” song coming from all different directions… Quick thinking made me pull out some of the many encyclopedia books I have been accumulating, one per child, and our big box of Sharpie Markers.

My instructions where very clear: DO AS YOU LIKE!

Before I knew it and without any planning, something magnificent happened:  the kids were absorbed, looking through the pages of an encyclopedia, reading and admiring the black and white images.

I gave them the OK to cut and draw as much as they wanted. So they did. And so did I. :)

We used all kinds of Sharpie Markers! Sometimes we drew together, and sometimes each one on his own.  My favorite thing to do was using the Fine Point Sharpie Marker to layer different colors in across hatch pattern.  These Sharpie markers were perfect for that because of their translucent yet brilliant quality.

To do this at home, you will need:

  • An old encyclopedia (you can find it at your parents house or at a second hand store)
  • Sharpie Markers
  • Scissors
  • Glue stick

How to:

  1. Flip through the pages
  2. Find an image you like
  3. Start to color the image
  4. Work in layers, it helps create depth and richness to the drawing (try and think like an impressionist)
  5. Add details to transform the image into something new. Even add notes!

Ready, set, go!!!

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Atlanta Gets Lost in Corey Barksdale

It’s time for another guest blogger!  This week we’ve got Chelsea Gattung on board.  Chelsea is one of our rockstar E-Marketing interns based in Atlanta, currently attending University of Georgia.  Keep an eye out for this little lady; I see big things to come in her future.  Follow Chelsea on Twitter @cgatt777.

*Chelsea Fun Fact: She can’t resist a good rap song found on YouTube, particularly ones that mention Sharpie.

 

Lost in Creation: Sharpie Artist, Corey Barksdale

The Atlanta artist, Corey Barksdale, pours his emotions into every stroke–taking his audience with him on a powerfully, passionate story on canvas.

Barksdale’s artistic passion derives from a family of artists. His mother and grandmother both exposed him to color and form at an early age and it was destined he, too, would join the family ranks.

The Nashville-bred, Atlanta-native graduated from the Atlanta College of Art in 2004 where abstract expressionists and mainstream artists like Jasper Johns, Clifford Still, and William deKooning influenced his creations. Barksdale also developed an admiration for the African American heritage and this theme can be seen throughout much of his work, depicting the love and strength within the community.

This experimental artist started using Sharpie markers in an efficient attempt to speed up the beginning stages of his pieces, but he quickly “uncapped” the unlimited possibilities of Sharpie markers as they effortlessly added definition to his acrylic paintings. His bold pieces have been showcased all over Georgia and he’s even done live performance art at Park Tavern and Atlanta’s Dogwood Festival (just to name a few). Imagine having art being created before you at your next event—he’ll do it!

After coming across his YouTube videos and colorful artwork, I jumped at the chance to interview Barksdale about using Sharpie Permanent Markers as an art medium and the passion behind his creations!

Read on for the complete interview with an imaginative, southern artist and his felt tip friend!

How did you get started as an artist?

As a child I drew non-stop. My mother would bring home hundreds of sheets of paper from her job and she use to ask my sister and I to fill up the pages with drawings and stories. So at a young age I developed a determination and passion for the creative process and artistic expression. I use to draw countless drawings, especially when school was out for the summer. 

Tell us a little about your genre. How would you describe your style? What makes your work stand out from the rest?

I incorporate a collage or assemblage effect in many of my art creations. Utilizing pasted images of city buildings, and abstract shapes are important elements in my art. The majority of my paintings have an apparent medium of acrylic paint and Sharpie markers, which are usually applied in bold colorful painterly strokes onto the canvas. Many people are attracted to the texture created by these mediums.

 Sharpie does not enocurage the use of Sharpie marker on skin.

What is one of your favorite exhibitions or events you have been involved in? What made this particular one stand out to you? Was it the specific pieces you showcased, the reactions received from attendees, or something else?

The Art Papers Art Auction is one of Atlanta’s signature visual art events that I have been fortunate to participate in. The event features many of the southeastern United States’ cutting-edge, established and emerging, fine artists.

What goes through your mind when you see people looking at your art? Is there a certain reaction you want to elicit?

I would like viewers of my artwork to experience what ever emotion or feeling I had at the time of producing the work of art. The facial expressions and gestures of characters in my paintings usually tell a story and let the viewer understand my emotion during the creative process. Usually I want to elicit a feeling of powerfulness positivity and endless possibilities

How did you come to use Sharpie markers in your work? Do you prefer using a certain type of Sharpie marker?

Approximately ten years ago I was trying to think of a way to speed up my art process. That’s where Sharpie markers came in. In stead of developing my sketch and first layer with paint I used Sharpie markers to create the basic outline and general form of whatever piece I created. As I continued to use Sharpie over a period of years I found out that the possibilities of the markers are limitless. Besides using the markers for the general form I also discovered that they could be used to define and refine my painting in the final stages of the process. I was able to incorporate the markers with acrylic paint effortlessly.

What about Sharpie markers made you incorporate them as a medium in your art process? Is it the variety of tip sizes, colors, other? Please describe how you use Sharpie as an art tool.

I enjoy the ease of using the markers. They go onto the canvas or wood surface with no problem. Once applied to the surface the markers give an opaque mark that is solid and bold, not watered-down or weak. The medium also resists fading over a period of time.

What other mediums, if any, do you wish to create with in the future? Do you have any comical experiences while trying a new medium?

Other mediums that I create with are acrylic paint, charcoal, and encaustic paint. Various forms of art and various mediums suit my style of art considering I like the challenge of mastering new mediums annually.

Tell us, what excites you about creating art?

Creating art is the ultimate form of expression available. Having the ability to create a picture of beauty where there was previously nothing at all gives me the ultimate satisfaction. When creating art all of my worries and anxieties are nonexistent. The hustle, bustle, and drama of city life become a distant thought. Creating can take you to a place that you previously thought impossible.

Take a look at all the ways Corey Barksdale Uncaps What’s Inside: www.coreybarksdale.com

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Man One Falls into The Gap

Recently, The GAP in Beverly Hills (on Robertson Blvd.) asked our very own Sharpie Squad member, Man One (Alex Poli) to do a couple live painting events for them!  Man One has documented the event on his blog, ManOneWorld and on Flickr through pictures and video.  Special guest stars, Sharpie Paint Markers, the oh-so classic black Fine Point Sharpie (custom with Man One’s signature) and the always mighty Magnum Sharpie came in handy for the artist as he personalized tees, tanks and posters for Gap customers.

Here’s a look at some of my fav pictures from the event but be sure to check out all the rest on ManOneWorld and on Man One’s Flickr page!

Gotta love a good graffiti artist –  Way to Uncap What’s Inside Man One!

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ATL Take Over with Artist, Mark Boomershine

Here's Caitlin!

Sharpie’s Atlanta Interns are taking over the Sharpie Blog today!  Caitlin Peterson (@cbarrettp) and Chelsea Gattung (@cgatt777) are two smart, sassy and quick-witted young ladies who have been working hard for us all summer long.  We thought it would be fun to put their blogging skills to the test and give them a chance to take over the Sharpie blog.  

Today, Caitlin has put together an amazing interview featuring an Atlanta-based artist with a knack for Sharpie Paint Markers, which I’m sure will knock your socks off!  So there you have it, now, take it away Caitlin…  

 

Ready to “Get hit with a Sharpie?”

 

…Because that’s exactly what Atlanta artist Mark Boomershine does to every painting, adding his own flare and style to iconic images eliciting a new smile, laugh or thoughtful pause to every piece.   

 Using Oil-Based Sharpie Paint Markers to add that little something extra to every piece, whether with revealing words or finishing highlights; he creates a look that sets his stuff apart from the rest.    

Boomershine has always harbored a passion for art, carving his own path to fuel his creativity and fashion the stories that are told through his art.  After completing his studies in art and business at the University of Alabama (as a Georgia Bulldawg I’ll try not to hold it against him) he explored a variety of different avenues, including life as a salesman, entrepreneur and inventor, before recently deciding to “Uncap” his craft full-time.  

 His unique style mixes text and imagery using a simplistic, color-block portraiture technique that is made powerful by the words spoken by and about the subject. Staying true to his roots, he honors his inspirations while redefining the original, creating his incredible and individualistic pop art.   

Bandit

Tonto

His cool southern charm and collaborative style has warranted some rightful attention and placed him within the pages of The Atlanta Magazine and The Atlanta Journal – Constitution.  His piece, “The Real Man Behind the Mask,” a portrayal of the Native American hero, Tonto, from The Lone Ranger television series, resides alongside the art of greats like Andy Warhol and Steve Penley in the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, Georgia.  There the unique works hang in the Contemporary collection in the American West Gallery.  

 Boomershine has said that his work isn’t complete without a little Sharpie love… and we’re OK with that! So if you’re ready to “get hit” read on and check out the complete interview with one of the coolest artists coming out of the Southern city.  

How did you get started as an artist?  

I have always been into art. In fact my art probably caused my not-so-stellar grades in every schooling before college. I was drawing or painting for hours upstairs when I should have been studying History or Math! I excelled in Advanced Placement art in high school, and I parlayed that into a minor in Studio Art at the University of Alabama (I majored in Business Management – how about that for left brain/right brain education). I later became my own art and marketing department as an entrepreneur and inventor because I was too cheap to hire anyone else. I have made art an integral part of my life. I have come to a place in my life where I can now make my art my single focus and my full time occupation. I call it throwing caution to the wind and going for the “Art Gusto”! 

My style

Tell us a little about your genre. How would you describe your style? What makes your work stand out from the rest?  

I fall into the Pop genre. My style is very bold use of color, design and composition with a fun play on words or strong use of text to make my art more dimensional. I feel my smart use of words makes my art have a layer that causes the viewer to stop and read things, which in turn means the viewer is spending more time interacting with the piece itself. I try and make my art relational.  

What is one of your favorite exhibitions or events you have been involved in? Why? I recently worked with BMW and a local BMW dealership to promote the latest 5 Series model. The cool part was that I was given a vintage 1986 325 BMW to paint as a rolling canvas. I painted the car in my garage, which I converted into a car-painting studio. For the show we turned the dealership showroom into a great looking gallery of 9 pieces of my art, one hand painted car, and some beautiful and shiny new BMW’s. Who would have thought a contemporary styled BMW dealership could turn into a hot looking art gallery?  (watch video below to see Mark working on the car in action) 

    

Art Car

 What goes through your mind when you see people looking at your art? Is there a certain reaction you want to elicit? What do you want people take from your art? I have to admit it is a little weird. You are exposing yourself. Your talents, your thoughts, and not to mention your hours of work that went into the piece. However, I relish the viewing of my pieces. I am in the spotlight for that moment in time and I like it. If I can elicit a smile, a chuckle, or even an outright laugh I am happy with that kind of reaction. Of course a swoon of amazement and unabashed praise is always welcome as well! Ha! I want people to take away the feeling that they have seen something original when they see my art. I want to take familiar people, objects, places, or animals and combine them with a twist in the form of text that makes the piece original in itself.  

  

 Being from, and living in Atlanta, how has the city inspired you? Does Atlanta art have a style all its own? What else serves as your inspiration? First of all, I love being from Atlanta. It is a perfect combination of Southern nostalgia and charm with a contemporary urban twist. I feel the city has inspired me by its wit and charm. I think a lot of my fun play on words may come from that subtle humor that a true Southerner can put into just a word or two. As far as my look, I think it lends itself to the more urban side of Atlanta. I have also traveled the world extensively and I feel I try and bring in some aspects of the classic European masters with the cutting edge pop artist of recent times.  

Wonder Woman

 Why did you want to incorporate Sharpie markers into your art process? Sharpie has always been by “go to” tool. As a youngster I would use them for model airplanes, and homemade toys. As an entrepreneur inventor I would use them to mark up samples of prototype models. So when I became a full time artist I naturally went to Sharpie products as a tool I wanted to use in my art. The colors available, specifically in the paint marker area, are perfect for my needs. I use every size tip available. From the broad chisel to the extra fine tip – I use them all! I could not do the monotonous lettering of some of my pieces with out the Sharpie Paint Marker. They allow for ultimate control of the medium and I trust the adhesion to the media. I specifically use the Sharpie Paint Marker in my lettering of text. I start by a light guide layer that is printed on the canvas. As the painting progresses I then go over the light guide with the paint marker. Sometimes I spend nearly 5 hours on the lettering on say a 36”x36” piece. Monotonous, but oh so effective. A few months ago I picked up a light blue fine tipped Sharpie Paint Marker and went crazy highlighting some elements of the painting. I absolutely loved the look! I now consider my paintings unfinished until I hit them with my Sharpie. Then my painting REALLY comes alive and I consider the piece ready for display.  

McQueen

Martini Curve

 Why do you feel the Oil Based Sharpie Paint Markers work best for the highlighting work that you do within your art? How do they enhance your work & where do you find them most useful? There is no product on the market that gives as good of paint coverage with one swipe nor the color selection as Sharpie’s Paint Marker. Once the paint is flowing through the tip the color applies in such a fluid and controlled manner they are a joy to work with. The color also stays very vibrant. Even when applied on top of other paints. Sharpies make my works come to life in the manner in which I use the pens to add highlights to areas of paintings in the form of accent lines. As mentioned above I also use the Sharpie Paint Marker with the extra fine point to do my meticulous lettering on the background of my paintings.  

Sharpie’s tagline is “Uncap What’s Inside!”  Does this apply to your work and if so, how? For sure! I mean c’mon…I turned an old BMW into a rolling canvas with the help of Sharpie! 

  

http://markboomershine.com

  

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Sharpie Squad Guest Blogger: Hanna Agar

I’m handing the Sharpie blog over to one of our Squad members today!  Sure you love my writing…but it’s refreshing to get a new voice on the blog. every so often.  For the next several months, (almost every Wednesday) I will pass the blog torch to one of our inspiring, super cool, muy interesante (sí sí) Squad members, giving them the chance to do basically whatever they want with the Sharpie Blog!  In doing so, I hope to give the Sharpie Squad yet another creative outlet, while also allowing you the opportunity to get to know each & every one of them a little better.

Now that you’ve gotten the rundown, let’s kick this thing into gear.  Sound the trumpets, turn on the bat signal, alert the media - our first-ever guest blogger, Hanna Agar is on stage!  Hanna is a 2nd year Squad member, is extremely creative & talented and… how about we hand the mic over to Hanna to tell you the rest - Take it away Miss Agar! *(Warning you might be blown away by what you are about to see.)

  Hi!  I’m Hanna Agar!

Here is a little bit about me…

My art pictograph

I am labeled a photographer, but I would like to think that I am more than that.  I am a craftsman, a painter, a performance artist, a stylist, a fashion designer, a set builder, and a light sculptor.  I create scenes, narratives, performances, metaphors, and I document them through photography.  I like to create very dramatic, mysterious, provocative, almost disturbing images that entangle as many skills as I can possibly manage to juggle to construct something more than just pressing a button.

I draw inspiration from stories and theater, from creepy nooks and crannies, from basements and thrift stores, and from my instinctive response to environmental trashing.  After taking a psychology class I began thinking more and more about what goes on in people’s minds. This prompted me to begin my newest body of work in which I give people writing assignments that I integrate into photos or use in performance installations.

Documented performance installations are something I find very compelling.  It allows me to create something more than just a photo.  I can create an experience.  These experiences I find to often be slightly therapeutic in that they require the subjects to really look inwards and think about themselves.  Each subject is alone in the experience and takes something different away from it.  That is my gift to them.  These performances are not rehearsed. I am compelled by these installations because the results that occur are unpredictable and unique.  The process could be repeated hundreds of times and each time would be different.  I enjoy these performances because while each image is in itself interesting, the entirety of the experience becomes truly fascinating.

Another element that weaves its way into my art is recycling.  This initially began while I was working in a photo studio and noticed that after the white background paper became slightly dirty it would be cut off and thrown away.  This always horrified me.  What a waste.  Here was this ten foot long role of semi-used paper lying crumpled in the dumpster.  I took it upon myself to be the savior, the resurrector of forgotten and abandoned material.  I started using these salvaged chunks of paper to line little nooks and crannies and to transform them into three-dimensional canvases.  These first creations emerged as documented performance installations as you’ve seen above, but then continued into creating not only sets but also costumes and props.  After reusing these materials I recycle what is left or store it away until inspiration strikes again.

 When I first received my invitation to join the Sharpie Squad I had two thoughts.

  1. It was a joke from work (I worked for two years at a photo studio called Sharp Photo and Portrait and we referred to ourselves as “Sharpies”).
  2. It was spam.

After getting over the shock that this was for real and overcoming my intimidation of feeling under qualified after looking at how accomplished all the other Squad members are I began to settle in and enjoy this experience.  When I would tell people about being a member of the Sharpie Squad the most common reaction was, “Oh, my god!  I love Sharpies”  …Yep, me too!  Since I had just graduated from college with my BFA in Photography and was experiencing a lull in creative job opportunities, joining the Sharpie Squad motivated me to keep going with my artwork and continue with my series of writing assignments.  Being on the Squad also motivated me to finally put a website together, which, drum role please, you can visit at www.hannaagar.com

For me being on the Sharpie Squad is a great way to transition from college to the “real world”.  The next step in my transition will be my move to NYC this fall where I hope to hone my skills as an assistant to some awesome photographer.  The next step…who knows?  But I can’t imagine my life continuing without some form or other of creative and exciting experiences.

 

…and that’s how you Uncap What’s Inside.  Thanks Hanna! You have an amazing talent.