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Daniel Roberts is out of this world

We love Facebook, beyond the unlimited stalking opportunities it allows,  it ALSO introduces us to amazing, out-of-this-world artists like Daniel Roberts!

We had the amazing opportunity to chat with Daniel about his work and his unique Sharpie style. .

Check it.

1. Tell me about yourself! Where are you from? Interests? Likes? Dislikes? Give us the good stuff!

First and foremost, hello, my name is Daniel Roberts from Las Cruces, but currently I’m now living in Albuquerque, NM. I am turning 22 in April, I obtained my associates degree in Business Management. I have completed/sold well over 50+ canvases as well as I’ve created custom art for a select few. I have participated in approximately 5 local art shows including two in downtown El Paso, TX. I have developed my portfolio over the past 8 years.  More than money, I want people to simply see my art and view it as they may. Enjoy it. Every single one of my canvases I have created is made 100% Sharpie products. People always ask me why I create my Sharpie Art, I tell them “because when I actually start creating with a blank canvas and my Sharpie markers, I forget about the rest of the world, forget about my problems and insecurities, about failures and an uncertain future, about everything, I lose myself in each canvas…”  Each one of them tells my story; you just have to use your own imagination to bring them to life. My work is unique, original, and overall expressive. My ideas, imagination, and creations become alive through Sharpie markers. ENJOY!!

2. What inspires you to uncap what’s inside? How do you use Sharpie markers in your work?

My inspirations and signature art twists, come from different parts of me which are influenced by the different beautiful images of life that surround me. A select few icons that are my muses include Alexander McQueen, Marco Mazzoni, Alex Pardee, High Fructose & GQ Magazines, Brandt Peters as well as other inspirational artists. Music has also been a huge part of my inspirations.

Each and every one of my canvases are made with 100% Sharpie markers. As a final touch and when I decide I’m finished with a final piece, I like to spray paint the boarders with black spray paint to create a perfect fitted frame. This also helps contrast perfectly against the vibrant Sharpie colors on the canvases.  I’m always keeping imagination, creativity and the arts alive!! These are only a few things what inspires me to uncap what’s inside!!

3. You create some amazing blended looks with the marker ink, any tips on how to achieve this?

I ALWAYS get asked how I am able to manipulate the Sharpie Ink into such a smooth coating. I would love the share my secrets with the world, but that is something I’m also very proud of. I enjoy knowing that it is such a mystery, kind of like chefs “top secret recipes.” I like having a unique medium that I truly enjoy creating with. This gives my art an interesting edge, as well as brilliant colors. My personal tip, black Sharpie markers are the key to bringing all of my major and minor details a life.

4. Favorite Sharpie?  Why? 

By far, my favorite Sharpie markers are the original Fine Point Sharpie. I love the outstanding variety of colors. I have different art supply boxes and bags FULL of black and colored Fine Point, Retractable Sharpie markers, Twin Tip, and of course the Chisel Tip. I use nothing else but 100% Sharpie for my pieces! I recently fell in love with the black Sharpie King Size marker; this truly helps me with a lot of my major detailing, considering my bigger sized canvases.

5. How would you describe your style of art? 

I would describe it as Nontraditional–Urban. New Age. Unique Art. I create and design beautiful images, but there is a darker, sicker twist to each piece. I create things that don’t exist, but I really wish they did. I like to incorporate elegance and beauty with a touch of obscenity and vulgarity. When I start to create a canvas, I like to find ways where imagination and creativity can be explored with images never seen.  [D.R.]

6. Your work is pretty whimsical and other-worldly, how did you get started?

All of my life I have found that different art comes from different minds. I remember creating my first few art pieces throughout school with acrylic, pastel, oils, and other art supplies, but I never found my true medium that inspired me to explore further. I was 13 when I started creating with my Sharpie markers. I was leaving my mark with Sharpie everywhere; it was around 14 when I discovered my ability to manipulate the Sharpie ink. That’s when my entire world and visions of art changed. I truthfully started to appreciate the colors and details in each piece. I already loved creating with my little monsters, box-headed figures and strange images, but my “Top Secret Art Recipe” was what brought each character to life and pushed me further to explore my limits as an artist.

7. What projects are you working on currently or can you tell us what you ARE working on next?

Currently, I am working as a barista for Satellite Café in Albuquerque, NM. I’ve been selected to participate in creating the marketing flyer for “Live in the Living Room”, which is different events that are featuring local artists, actors, and musicians that come to perform for in our café. I also have been searching for different art galleries in New Mexico and around the country to try and participate in a show or even just get help in pointing me in the right direction for my kind of art. And always, I’m continuously working on different canvases around my house, which accumulate all of my wall space!! My Sharpie Art is my passion, my inspiration is everywhere!

8. Do you have a soft spot for one of your pieces in particular?

Well, of course I have my favorites, but each canvas contains an emotion of me. My heart, mind, body and soul go into each piece, my life and experiences (good and bad) are what influence my art. There are both happy and very detrimental pieces in my art collection. The titles of each canvas can also usually say a lot, but overall, your imagination is what really shows me as an artist I am telling you a story. I want people to view my art and focus on something nontraditional and let their minds explore.

Want to more? Check out all of Daniel’s work by becoming a fan of his on Facebook and checking out his website!

Want to OWN one of these other worldly peices? Shoot him a note at bleepy00012@yahoo.com

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Classic Marker; New Media

Our intern, Caitlin ( @inktern), has continued to earn her Sharpie stripes, and after doing a great job on her first interview, she is taking another crack at the blog! Read on for Caitlin’s interview with Sharpie artist Nicole Bishopp.

It used to be difficult to get your art work out for the world to see.  Art galleries, art shows or maybe the occasional print article was an artist’s best chance at gaining a following. The digital world and social media has changed all that. Today’s featured Sharpie artist shows us how.

Nicole Bishopp is a mom, an illustrator, a social media enthusiast and most importantly (at least in terms of this blog) a Sharpie Marker artist. She maintains a website, a Facebook page, a Twitter account, a blog and a Tumblr all dedicated to her artwork. Nicole embraces the far reaching potential of social media outlets to showcase her art to the world. Constantly updating her Facebook page with new work for fans to comment on,  her social outlets allow Nicole the opportunity to sell her artwork and create custom pieces for those interested.

                                       

Expressing her feelings through the intricate details of her work, she never sets out to draw something specific, it is common for her work to become mesmerizing and for different creatures to appear as her drawings advance. The thick, bold, expressive lines of her art are amazingly done with simply the classic black Sharpie Marker. The Sharpie family may have dozens of colors to choose from, but Nicole makes her statement with the original black Sharpie Fine Marker. Her work helps show what you can start with even the most basic Sharpie Marker.

Here is some more of what Nicole had to say: 

How did you get started using Sharpie Markers: I have always loved drawing with Sharpie markers. I have tried every marker out there and Sharpie is the best because it has the crispest line and one marker will last me an entire drawing.

Where do your ideas for your pieces come from: Most of my ideas just happened. I draw and things appear in the drawings. I draw to express my feelings. I would have to say the tone of my work is mesmerizing, mind melting, a puzzle for the eyes, psychedelic maybe, in your face (bold), makes a statement.

How long does it take to do a piece: Surprisingly it only takes a good 4-5 hours to complete one drawing. Sometimes I will start a drawing and stop half way and then finish it the next day. I never start over I just draw over something if I don’t like the way it looks.

How the heck do you keep up with all your digital sites: Actually, I spent a lot of time learning about online marketing and it actually all links together. Plus the key is having a smart phone. I wouldn’t be able to keep up with the posts and such on Facebook if I didn’t have my DRIODX.

What’s Your Motivation: I started drawing again after the birth of my son. There were many sleepless nights so drawing was my way to stay sane during that period. Then it turned into “my time” to get away from the daily routine. Now it’s just to relax and to unravel from the day’s events.

Favorite Sharpie: Hands down the Original Fine Point Black! The point on this pen can do super tiny detail to big areas all in one drawing.    

   

Your work was just featured in a few galleries. How cool was that?: I just started putting my stuff out there is March of this year and it’s amazing how quickly it was received by the Facebook art community. It was so cool to see people request my work to be featured! Every time I get a feature it just makes me want to do better and create something even more amazing.

                                              

Where is your career heading: Well currently I am working on a lot of commission requests and getting my work ready to show in Fort Collins, Colorado and Wenatchee, Wash. I am also planning on launching some new products with my designs in the fall/winter.

If there was one place your art could take you, where would it be: I think it would be really fun to own my own product line with my designs that businesses could use on their products (for example surf, skate, snow shops) as well as on like t-shirts, skateboards, shoes, really anything you could put a design on.

Want to learn more about Nicole? You can find her on Twitter and Facebook or contact her via e-mail at nicole.bishopp@gmail.com.

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Monster Mash

Monsters! MONSTERS, EVERYWHERE!!  Wait! Before you run and hide under your bed,  you might want to stop and  get to know these classically feared beasts. What if,  just like our irrational fear of robot world domination, these frightening lookin’ fellas wanted nothing more than to make your day?   

Today’s Sharpie artist, Allie Kelley, is breaking the monster mold and proving there is more behind these fiendish looks than gnashing teeth. Prepare yourself for one frighteningly great interview, we are so glad you’re here…      

Featured Sharpie Artist: Allie Kelley

Tell me about yourself!  Is this the part where I try to sound brilliant and interesting?  Well, I’m not great at that. The truth is I am a 20-something, self-taught artist who loves to laugh and wants to create quirky things that make other people smile and think. I am currently a Massage Therapist, which I love, but I dream of one day having a career where I get paid to create.   

Ms. Allie Kelly, Monster momma

How did you get started as an artist? I think I’ve been creative since I could hold a crayon. When I was little my mother and I moved into a house where my bedroom had been painted yellow and my Mom hated it. She gave me some crayons and told me to draw all over the walls, when they were full- she was painting the room another color.    

How would you describe your personal style?  Uh… clothing wise? I like vintage, I like scarves, and I like threadless.com t-shirts. 

Artistically? I’m still trying to figure that out, to be honest.   I try to make interesting, whimsical pieces that I’m going to want to look at 5 years from now… it’s like if Dr. Seuss and Tim Burton somehow had a child and that child was obsessed with vivid colors.   

 

Where do you draw inspiration from? A handy method is to stay up crazy late, chug a Red bull or two and sketch till I can’t keep my eyes open. I will take inspiration anyway I can get it. Spring trees in bloom, Discovery channel, city museums, and my trusted friends saying: “DRAW THIS!” are all ways that I’ve found a subject or a theme for my work. (Specific to this interview: my friend Amanda said: “you should draw monsters” and so I did.)   

How do you use Sharpie markers in your work? I use Sharpie markers at many levels. If I’m working on a painting, I use Sharpie markers for the pre-draw or I use Sharpie to doodle and try to gain inspiration. Other times (and more often lately) I just like to sit down with some great paper and a 24 pack of the Ultra Fine Point Sharpie markers and create from there. I love how the color combinations really mesh on the page and how the small tip allows for a lot of tiny wonderful details.   

Favorite Sharpie?  Why? I love using the Ultra Fine Point in pastel and light colors.  People don’t expect those tiny details in pink lemonade.  I think the one I gravitate to the most is the Blue Ice in the Ultra Fine Point.  I love the way it pops off my paper.   

   

 

What is it about monsters that you love so much? I love that monsters surprise you. People usually place anything very unfamiliar in their “monster” category.  Unfortunately it’s a natural response to feel that if it’s different, it’s scary. Once you get past your discomfort you can often be surprised that your “monster” is interesting, or funny, or kind.   My monsters look the part, but they say nice things to you. They remind you that you are loved and that you make others happy.   They tell you things your friends and neighbors should say to you every day.   

If you came face to face with one of your monster doodles in real life what would you say to him/her? Well, I would hope the Doodle monster would be my size and not teeny-tiny. I would also hope they would be down for going to have tea and a chat!!! Oh, I would have so many questions!! What do you eat? Do you have pets?  How old are you?! Do doodle monsters have jobs to work at? I guess I should be exploring all this with my art- and I will probably touch on some of it- but I would LOVE to just ask them!   

What is the strangest monster you’ve ever created? Prettiest? Ugliest? Funniest? This is the hardest question for me. I don’t think of my monsters in those terms.  So, I listed a few and told you what I think they would be like if one was behind you in a coffee shop:  

"To me, this is the supportive mom of the Doodle monster family"

"This guy might be the class clown"

"And this guy, He’s my favorite. If I look at him with the paper one way I see a proud water Buffalo thing, and if I flip the paper the other way I see a tiny terrier puppy with tentacles."

"I think of this one as my compassionate little sister of the monster doodle family"

 

Monster names?  How do I come up with them?  I only have one doodle named: BLOAT MONSTER.  I think it’s a name so easy to relate to and sympathize. He is the exception. 

Bloat Monster!

I think the neatest thing about my monsters is that different people see them as different things.  I think if I named them, it would influence what people saw- so I try to stay away from giving them names.   

Current work?  I am always trying to create and explore.  I doodle, sketch and collage a lot- but mostly I consider myself a painter.  Recently I have been obsessed with painting Dinos and Doodle Monsters and 2-headed creatures.   I’ve also started carrying around the largest sketch pad I can, trying to fill it with Sharpie drawings, paint, and hodgepodge, occasionally all 3 on one page! 

Advice for other young artists?  The best “arty” advice I ever received was:

 “Create every day.” 

 My attempt to follow that advice has made all the difference in my work and my artistic style.

What am I going to do with my monster doodles?  I’m going to start with creating more.  To me, each is unique and has a different feeling to them. Later this year, I have a few shows in Virginia coming up to feature them in.  Eventually though, I would like to create a children’s book with and for them. To teach kids about judging at first glance and why that’s not the best way to go through the world.  Maybe what seems like a weird blobby monster is a friend you’ve been looking for.

Thank you so much to Allie for uncapping her Monster gang with us! For more on Allie and her posse check her out on her blog, Facebook page, or, if you want a Monster friend all your own, on Etsy!

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Good Bot, Bad Bot

They say one day robots will take over the world… But who are they anyway? And why are they teeing up robots as bad guys? What if they were good? What if robots didn’t necessarily take over the world, but were more of our buddies? What if they brought joy, followed you around giving compliments on say, your pants or a school project? What if robots offered great advice or boosted your confidence? What if…

Thanks to today’s featured artist, that “what if” just turned into “what is.” Addicted to Sharpie Oil-Based Paint markers, Gary Hirsch has assembled an army of androids that love, caffeinate, knit, stop time, even give you permission to be a bit callous now and then.

Hirsch, creator of Joy Bots took time to answer our Sharpie Q&A. Warning, it’s a bit lengthy but a guaranteed good read!

Featured Sharpie Artist: Gary Hirsch

Tell me about yourself!  Where are you from? Interests? Likes? Dislikes? Pet Peeves? My life has been made up of a series of collisions: I am an actor (improviser) and a business consultant/facilitator, and a painter, and a Dad, and a wanna-be marine biologist. I collide all of them in various ways…it’s never a dull moment. I found (really co-founded) a mini-micro-national, creative consultancy called On Your Feet. We use highly experiential methods from the world of improvisation, and elsewhere, to help organizations communicate, create and relate—all while having a ridiculously good time. Before On Your Feet I was an improv performer (still am), painter (still am), and t-shirt artist (nope gave that one up).

I am best know in my adopted hometown of Portland, Oregon (I am an ex- Cleveland Heights, Ohio guy) for a large public art commission that the city asked me to create in 1996; it’s called Upstream Downtown- eighteen giant aluminum fish that hang from the open spaces of one of Portland’s ugliest parking garages, hopefully the fish make it a little more beautiful.

Upstream Downtown

Likes: The Ali G Show, Peach Tazo, Baba Ganoush, Radio Lab, The Moth, A Sunday night show of AsssCat performed a The Upright Citizen’s Brigade in NYC or L.A., my son’s band Meet Your Monster, and I am a sucker for the video series “Where the Hell is Matt”, the guy that dances seemingly in every country on the planet (my daughter rolls her eyes whenever I watch it because I inevitably cry every time and whisper things like “ yes….this gives me hope….”). 

Peeves: Anything passive aggressive. 

How did you get started as an artist?   When I was growing up I had a lot of nightmares. You know, your basic, run of the mill nightmares- giant hands swooping down from the attic, grabbing you out of bed and swallowing you whole, where he would land in a stomach that was really a grave yard populated by zombies, yeah those kind of nightmares…On these nights when I couldn’t sleep I would sit with my father in the kitchen and draw the monsters from his nightmares. We would stay up for hours and my Dad would help me name these creatures (My parents saved all of these doodles, I still think they are some of my best work). Once during a late night doodling session my father leaned over and said, “You know, if you can create them, then you can also erase them.” So I would draw and erase and after a while the nightmares would come a bit less frequently.  I never stopped doodling since. 

 

How would you describe your personal style? I am a doodler at heart. I must doodle to survive, period. This got me into a lot of trouble in school, because teachers always thought I wasn’t paying attention when I was scribbling in the margins of my notebook. But I was, I really was Mrs. White! Years later I saw an article that found that some people listen better when they are doodling….yes! Vindicated! 

Where do you draw inspiration from?  There is an army of artists that I am in awe of: Goya, Haring, Beckman, Dubuffet, Scharf, Baseman. Last year, I attended Tim Burton’s visual art exhibition at the MOMA and that was enough to keep my inspiration gas tank easily full these past 7 months. The thing that all of these masters of their craft have in common is that their work is all about stories. I am addicted to stories. I dive deeply into the world of story and narrative, mostly through my experiences as an improv theater performer. What keeps interesting me is the idea of incomplete story…of starting something and inviting the audience to finish it, to co-create it with me. Sure, I have something in mind when I paint…..but so do you when you look at the painting. I love that a single piece of stimulus can ignite a flood of ideas and stories. 

A-Ten-Hut!

How do you use Sharpie markers in your work?  Discovering the Sharpie Oil-Based Paint Marker was a revelation, really (and I am not just saying that because you are Sharpie, that would very brown nosey)! It was kind of like a divine intervention from the art gods. I needed something with vivid color, fast drying that could work on a domino….viola, prayers answered! 

Favorite Sharpie. Why? I’m currently having a love affair with Sharpie Extra-Fine Oil-Based Paint Markers. Beautiful, consistent line, allows me to get small and tight with details, dries amazingly fast, and sticks to everything….cue the music I feel an endorsement coming on! 

What is it about robots that you love so much?  I had this idea about 5 years ago: Imagine that you had an imaginary robot that followed you around all day and gave you outrageous compliments. It was a fun idea to imagine, so I included it in an illustrated journal that we made for our On Your Feet clients and gave them out when we were running innovation and creativity sessions. This image of a robot that follows you around giving you compliments keep haunting me…I mean seriously, how cool would that be? It would be invisible and only you would know it was there and it would say things to you like “ Nice pants” or “That was a smart thing to do” or “You made the right choice.”  So this year, I thought, “Let’s make the robots real” and after playing with several surfaces, we stumbled on the domino. Now instead of an invisible robot you have a small pocket robot.   

Bundle of Bots

What does one do with an army of robots? What do the robots do for me? This tiny robot army is programmed to bring you joy! Each Joy Bot is hand-painted, on-of-a-kind pocket friend. 

To activate simply:

  1. Allow your robot to get to know you by placing him on your desk, kitchen counter or cubicle or wherever you spend the most amount of time.
  2. Wait until he notices something about you (it won’t take long) and then listen while he tells* you how wonderful you are, or how much he loves you, or how brave you have been, etc. (what he says depends on the type of robot you have selected). (see attached image of a sample of the operating instructions that come with every Joy Bot)
  3. Take him with you everywhere you go for the maximum domino effect.

* The robots don’t really talk (’cause they’re painted dominoes) but you can imagine that they do. 

Pop Quiz! What Bot is this?

There are 10 types of Joy Bots:

  • Love Bot: Programmed To Love You
  • Joy Bot: Programmed to Make You Feel Great
  • Brave Bot: Programed To Give Your Confidence a Jolt
  • Listening Bot: Programmed To Listen To You, Unconditionally
  • Yes Bot: Programmed To Say “Yes” To Anything You Say
  • Mean Bot: Programmed to Give You Permission To Be a little petty, mean, or whiny
  • Caffeine Bot: Programmed To Wake You Up
  • Knitting Bot: Programmed To Make You a Knitting Sensation
  • Time Bot: Programmed to Stop Time (so you can re-live great moments or erase bad moments)
  • Advice Bot: Gives you Outrageously Useful Advice

What is your favorite bot? I’m a big fan of The Time Bot. It stops time so you can go back and erase a stupid mistake or relive a wonderful moment. A very useful ability, I would say. 

Time Bots

What is the Caffeine Bot’s favorite kind of caffeine?  No surprise, it’s coffee. I made them to accompany an exhibition of paintings that I was having in my neighborhood at a local coffee shop. I imagined that having a Caffeine Bot would help me reduce my coffee consumption because they are programmed to Wake You Up. (no such luck, still pouring down the coffee.) 

Caffeine Bots

If your Joy Bots had a theme song what would it be?  No brainer….Robot Parade, by They Might Be Giants, one of my kid’s favorite songs! Also love Birdhouse In The Soul by TMBG as well, either work. 

Why is the Mean Bot so mean?! He’s there to give you permission to be a little mean, or petty, or “snivelly”…S ometimes we just have to vent…The Mean Bot  lets you express the darker side, without shame. 

Mean Bots

How do you come up with all of the robots? It’s all about the story they tell the viewer. I want to make Bots that can give you advice, tell you how wonderful you are, or stop. The idea is that they all have to help you have a conversation with yourself. Of course, the Bots don’t actually talk but still people have told me things like, “My Bot just encouraged me to take risk” or “I felt great today because my Bot told me to how nice and helpful I am to my business partner.” I had one woman contact me for a set of Brave Bots for her family to help them who with coping with the recent death of a loved one. Are these people crazy? Of course not, they are just realizing something about themselves. The Bots don’t actually talk, but something about them allows people to imagine that they do, and somehow gives voice to a few, small and hopefully wonderful tid-bits about themselves. 

What’s in the future for Joy Bots?  Not sure, they really do have a life of their own. I don’t have a ton of time to make them right now because I’m so busy with my consulting work, so any painting time is a luxury and a treat. I love making small batches of limited editions when I get spare moments. I have been approached to mass produce them for the gift market, but I can’t see doing that, it is such a joy to strap on my head phones with a podcast from Radio Lab, or The Moth, listen to a wonderful story. Let my mind wander, and slowly paint, not knowing what will emerge until the final stroke of the pen. I will just keep making them, and showing them to whoever is interested and let the rest work itself out. 

Knit Bots Listening Bots

Do you have any advice for other artists? Oy, I hate questions like this because it assumes I know WTF I am doing. I guess I would say what I say to my 16 year old son who is trying to break into the music industry and that is, Make the call. If someone says “you should call me,” DO IT. If something happens don’t ponder if it is “good” or “bad,” ask yourself “What can I do with this?” This is ingrained in me from all of my improv work. Improvisers are masters at using what they have and turning nothing into something. I see opportunity in lots of things; I would encourage other artists to turn down the dial on their own self judgment, notice more around them and use it as an opportunity. 

How can I get a bot? Right now I sell at few galleries across the country and on my art site, www.doodlehouse.com. You can also go directly to my Etsy site: http://www.etsy.com/shop/GaryHirschartshop 

Anything I didn’t ask that you would like to add? Sure, but this interview is way too long as it is. I’m an extravert and have to talk to think, so thanks for letting me blab!

Thanks again to Gary for the EXCELLENT interview! Be sure to check out the Joy Boy website and build your own BOT army!

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Tote Self-Expression to School

Handing over the mic this morning to Sharpie Intern, Jacque Smith.  A ’09 grad, Jacque majored in PR at Illinois State University with minors in French and International Studies (pretty impressive, eh!?). With a love for new technology and all things social, “Jack-attack” has been helping the team stay on top of new trends and hot topics in the ever-changing social space.

Recently, Jacque had the chance to lead a Q&A with potentially one of our youngest and ever-so talented Sharpie Artists, Miriah Garnett…

 

Sharpie fanatics would agree: give someone a Sharpie and expect  INKspiration! Read how Miriah Garnett created a stylish design on her sister’s book bag (that got the sister seal of approval), her other Sharpie uses, and Miarah’s advice to other young artists:

Tell me about yourself:

I’m Miriah Garnett, an International Baccalaureate student at North Hagerstown High School. I love to listen to music. It’s a big part of my life. Along with music, I enjoy painting, decorating, doing my nails, scrap booking, reading, texting, and of course shopping.  I am a big fan of R&B, hip-hop, pop, and old school music. I’m a fan of M&Ms, especially the new pretzel kind. I’m a huge Twilight fan. I have read all the books and I am anxiously awaiting the premier of the 4th movie, Breaking Dawn. Some things I don’t like are: stinkbugs (they’re really gross), country music and gory horror movies.

What year in school are you?  Any favorite classes?  Extra-curriculars?

I am in the Eleventh grade. My favorite class is Biology, because I really enjoy sciences and plan to go into the medical field when I’m older. I am involved in the art and scrap-booking clubs at my school.

What inspired you to design a book bag for your sister?

In Kindergarten, it has been a sort of tradition to decorate your tote bag for school, which is something I even did as a kid. So, my little sister Armani (being the girlie girl that she is) wanted a cute design for her book bag. To get some ideas, we went to our local fabric store to look for some pretty prints or designs for some inspiration. We found one that was pink with doodles. Using this design, I incorporated my own twist to it and went all out decorating the whole book bag in this manner.

Of all art supplies, why Sharpie?  What made you choose to customize the backpack with Sharpie markers?

I chose Sharpie because, since my mom is an art teacher, we have always trusted Sharpies to have precise lines and long lasting effects. Sharpies have also always had bright and vibrant colors that I love.

Have you customized any other school supplies or accessories?

I use Sharpie markers to label school supplies and clothes, make card designs, when organizing, to color Shrinky Dinks, to sign t-shirts, and to draw temporary tattoos.

What goes into designing a backpack? How long does it take?

Designing a book bag is actually a very simple, easy, and creative way to design something by adding your own unique touch. In order to design one all you need to know is what you want to create on your book bag and what Sharpie colors you would like to use. Depending on how intricate the design is will determine how long it will take to finish the book bag. The designs could range from flower patterns, to a drawing of your favorite sports team’s logo. The possibilities are limitless.

Dad, Mom, and Armani show off her new, stylish bookbag

How did your sister react to your Sharpie masterpiece?My sister absolutely ♥loved the book bag. It was cute and girlie and was everything she was hoping for. It was definitely something we would not have found in the store.

Top 5 essential items that are always in your book bag:

  1. Books (I’ve never gone home from school without books—ever!)
  2. My huge, graphing display calculator
  3. Different colored pens and pencils, including my Sharpie markers
  4. Portable hole punch
  5. USB flash drive

Aside from customizing some really cool backpacks, what else do you enjoying doing on your down time?

As I said before , I love listening to music. I am also a big fan of shopping for shoes. Even just shopping in general “floats my boat.” I also love to design and paint my own nails. It’s something I have started doing for a year or two and really enjoy. It’s a different way of expressing yourself.

One last question… are you a fan of Glee or High School Musical? What character do you relate to the most & of all the cast members, who would you most want to design a backpack for?!

I’m a fan of High School Musical! My obsession phase is very much over, but I can still sing any song by heart . I would have to say that of all the characters, I relate to Gabriella Montez the most because of having to transfer to a new school and meet different people. I can also relate to her “nerdy” side because of being part of the IB program. If I could design a backpack for someone, it would have to Sharpay Evans because of her bold and unique style—it is a style within itself.

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Who Is The Bald Guy?

Sharpie Artist. Designer. Master of the Tweet. Media Enthusiast. Bald Brilliance.  

Today’s featured artist is Michael Krivicka and I think you will come to find these adjectives suit him rather well.  Krivicka, aka Who is the Bald Guy, is not limited to creating only with his Sharpie though… This artist takes on all sorts of artistic endeavors - From animation to PSAs, smart phone apps to Twitter campaigns, he even proposed to his now fiancée on WEtv! Read on to find out exactly who this bald guy really is…

Michael Krivicka

Tell me about yourself!  My name is Michael Krivicka and I am a video producer living & working in New York City. I was born in Slovakia in 1976 and went to high school in Germany from 1986. I moved to the US in 1996 for college and graduated summa cum laude from NJCU with a BA in Media Arts in 2000. While working in NYC as a video editor I started creating short films and submitting them to festivals. I am constantly working on something. Even when I can’t sleep at night I start creating things – drawings, writings, scripting out video projects. I can not “not do” anything. I have to create. All the time.  

How would you describe your personal style?  My personal style is raw and gritty. A bit dark sometimes. I never create something just because it looks cool. There is always a message or expression. It has to have a certain feel of realism. Like New York City – it feels real. Every building is real – has a history, has a life. If you compare it with LA for example, then LA seems fake – it seems made up and made pretty and comfortable for other people’s happiness. I recently made this anti-smoking PSA which is targeted at urban teens: Smoking Skills It’s raw and gritty.  

What is your creation & design process like?  I create on impulse. I get an idea and want to drop everything I’m doing at that moment and jump right into creating that idea. Some things, like my Sharpie animations for example, take a while to create. Days or even weeks. While other people would shoot themselves in the head, I find a certain peace in the very long and detailed oriented creation process. I always have a very clear end result in mind, but I find myself altering things as I create them.

Where do Sharpie markers come into your work?  They are an essential part of my every day life. It can be anything from taking a simple note on a piece of paper to creating an elaborate animation project. (BTW I used hundreds of Sharpie markers for the two animations I created for Sharpie. Yes – hundreds.) 

When did you come up with the idea for this Sharpie commercial?  What is the concept behind it?  Not too long ago I had a blog. On that blog I started writing about ideas for ads and entire ad campaigns. One of the brands I blogged about was Sharpie. Instead of writing about the ad campaign idea I decided to create two of the ads that I pictured being part of the campaign concept, which was a series of art works created with Sharpies (drawings, animations, sculptures, etc…) The tagline was “Create Life”. So I created these two very different animation pieces. That was that. The broad idea was to create user generated content and turn it into ads. That would give artists and every day Joes like me a chance to submit Sharpie creations, have them be voted on, and get a chance to be selected as part of a series (which was the ad campaign). So the commercials would be actual art works by real people. It would add the “real human touch” to things. I thought it was a pretty good idea. Here are both clips:

 

  

The second one is rotoscope animation. I recorded myself on video first and then animated the individual frame.  Here are some pics:

Michael, bringing his vision to life

Michael, Uncapping What's Inside

I first saw your video a while back, just stumbled upon it and thought it was cool.  Then one day, I find you striking up a convo on Twitter about your “Sharpie Commercial: Butterfly at Night”.  (Cool, I’ve connected with the artist!)  That’s not it though, after digging around I find that you’ve got a little something going on in the Twitter-verse…  Tell me about what you are trying to achieve on Twitter.

Glad you took notice :) I was hoping someone from Sharpie would. I do various things –mainly viral & social media stuff. I like to create “what if” scenarios, like I did with one of my virals called “Nude It”.  “Nude It” is a revolutionary iPhone app that lets the user see others naked. The video now has over 1.8 million views on YouTube alone (more on other video hosting sites) and is still sparking conversations.  I basically like creating “what if” scenarios and give people stuff to talk about.

I use Twitter for various social media experiments. My latest was to reach Jimmy Fallon (and other celebrities). The concept was to use social media and news media to reach a celebrity and have that celebrity view a website & video I created

  http://www.jimmyfallonthanksforfollowingmeontwitter.com   

 http://www.jimmyfallonpleasefollowmeontwitter.com  

The video was a creative and elaborate plea to get that celebrity to follow me. The experiment worked, and I now have Jimmy Fallon, Ellen DeGeneres, Wendy Williams, and David Pogue following me. I basically wanted to prove that it is possible to reach ANYONE on Twitter with just a simple but creative idea. And I did. All it takes is an idea. That’s all. It’s that simple.

If you could get one person to follow you on Twitter who would it be?  A celebrity who is alive and who is actively using twitter? That would be Ashton Kutcher. I got some ideas he would want to hear. 

You’re really good at animation, yet I don’t see a lot of your work out there.  Why is that?  I simply can’t stick to just one thing. I have to do a wide spectrum of things. I like the moving image a lot. So it’s either my HD cam or my 16mm Bolex sometimes. I absolutely love animating, but sometimes the time is just not there. I am now planning my wedding. 

 I proposed to my fiancée on my own web show, which I have pitched to Wetv. It’s called Put A Ring On It. I’ll bet you five bucks you’ll cry at the end. So, basically, that is another reason why there is so little of my animation work out there: I do a ton of other stuff. And somewhere in between I try to get some sleep :)

If you grew your hair back, would that completely destroy the direction of “Who is the Bald Guy”?  Would you change it to “Who is the Hairy Dude”?  That’s actually really funny. Yes, it would affect the “bald guy” image quite a bit. Not sure if “hairy dude” would be the right term for it then. Seriously: that was funny. Made me laugh.

Out of complete random curiosity… Would you ever consider wearing a bald cap and customizing it with Sharpie markers?  I’ve done some crazy things in my life, but I’ve never worn a bald cap that was customized with Sharpie markers. I’d be open to a crazy bet that would involve that :)

Favorite Sharpie? Hmm, I don’t think I have one. Sorry. Just being honest. It all depends on the need. If I need a thick Sharpie, then that’s what I’ll use. If I need a fine Sharpie, then I’ll go with that.

Motto to live by:

Create. Leave your mark. You can sleep when you’re dead.

When I get old, I want to be able to look back at my life and see the things I have done. I don’t want to look back and see myself watching Jersey Shore.

Are you currently working on anything that you can tell us about?  Exactly a week ago I launched a new viral called “3D Hologram app for Iphone 5”.  It just got its first 100,000 views on YouTube. I am now creating a video invite for my groomsmen. It involves a lot of stop-motion animation. Will post soon :)

 

Follow Michael on Twitter @whoisthebaldguy.

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The Perfect Hello

Today’s Sharpie artist is the man behind The Hello Project, Joseph Delhommer.  With *Kristen Caston (who you may remember as our LIVE artist at the 2010 Sharpie Squad Virtual Summit), Delhommer launched THP, an “online social collaboration” aimed at recharging the everyday opener. Simply put, The Hello Project invites anyone and everyone to say Hello in a creative way onto a 3×3 Post-it® .  Doodle it, sketch it, write it- whatever your heart desires, there is no right or wrong way to say hello!

 Now here it is, a Sharpie interview for the record books…  Get to know the man who’s taking an ordinary greeting to extraordinary levels.  This is Joseph Delhommer and The Hello Project!

Get to know J.D. & The Hello Project…

 

Hello Joe!

Background info? Where are you from?

Where I come from, people are always beach ready and never afraid to dance.

In the Dominican Republic it never gets cold so people never get stiff, that’s why Miami Beach was an easy move for me but Hamburg and Chicago weren’t. But I made do.

Occupation? Yes.

Interests? Likes? Dislikes? I am the light up type of person and I look for the same energy in music, people, and anything else I get involved with.

Pet Peeves? Being asked what my pet peeve is.  But in all seriousness, I hate fake people.

Tell me about The Hello Project: It all started back in July last year here in Chicago. A designer friend, Kristen Caston, used to leave me post-it notes that said “Hi” every time she passed by my office when I wasn’t there. One day I arranged four of them on my desk all in a row. And the idea just came to me…it stared in my face and said, “hello.” After talking about it with my copywriter, Carlos Rangel, we came up with the name and registered the URL on the spot. All in all, it took no more than five minutes. We officially launched the site to the public on September 1st. (Happy 1st Bday THP!)

What is it about the word “Hello”?  Why not something else? (Maybe “The How Are You Project,” “The Nice Pants Project”, “The Nice to Meet You Project”) Because HELLO is universal. It’s simple and has the power to instantly change the dynamic between you and a stranger.

What is THP’s mission? / What do you hope to get out of this? When people get a creative urge, Post-its are a great canvas to let it loose on.  The Hello Project gives creative’s a perfect excuse to doodle.  This is what got the first 20 people, all close friends, involved and this seemed like a great way to connect with creative types all around the world.

How many people are involved in THP? Amazingly over 350 people have participated thus far, some having contributed four or five post-its!

What are some favorite “Hello’s” that you’ve received ? Throwing the hard questions at me huh?  I’m not naming favorites, some people have flair and it’s cool to see it shine on their submissions.

Do you limit entries to only words? No. No limits.

Who can submit to the Hello Project? And how? It is open to anyone who wants to say “hello”. (FYI: We do not supply the post-its, the Sharpie products nor do we provide any scanning services.) People hand off their hello in person or email a JPEG to hi@thehelloproject.com.

What’s your idea of “the perfect HELLO?” A Brit saying Ello Govnah!!

How many different ways are there to say hello on a yellow sticky note?  Precisely 312,983,673,345,683,893,450,937 different ways.

Do you think Sharpie has any impact on THP? If so, How? Sharpie has an uncanny way of tapping into the creative vein; I think it’s because of the freedom you get to write as fast or slow as you want.  The ink’s there either way. And it works nicely with a post it because it doesn’t take much work to fill it up with your design.

If you could have any one person in the entire world submit a “HELLO” to THP, who would it be? Stefan Sagmeister.

(This happens to me now and again and I wonder if you have had a similar experience and what your opinion is on this happening…)

SCENARIO: You’re walking down the street when you make eye contact with a passerby, being the friendly person you are, you say Hello!  To which the passerby responds with a dumbfounded look, as if you had three heads and just asked him/her to join you for a PB&J and a light afternoon of cliff diving…

….What are your thoughts on this scenario?  Why do you think some people find it odd when a stranger says hello? I know what you mean! Ever since I came to the US I noticed people are way more defensive.  People create a comfort bubble between plugging in their iPods and staring at the sidewalk.  And when the bubble gets popped, bam. They assume the worst.

Anything I didn’t ask that you would like to add? The really big question is when will the lovely Whitney Kelly send in a hello of her own? Other than that, I think you nailed it. Pat yourself on the back, then grab a post it and doodle us a hello! (Forget about me, I’m getting the entire Sharpie Team to send in Hello’s!)

 Become a fan on Facebook! http://facebook.com/thehelloproject

Follow THP on Twitter http://twitter.com/projecthello

 

*Joseph Delhommer and Kristen Caston currently run The Hello Project and have been since Sept. 1, 2009.

Kristen Caston is The Hello Project's greatest contributor with over 35 "HELLO's" (pictured: Susan Wassel, Kristen Caston, Whitney Kelly)

Want more of The Hello Project?  Stay Tuned, Sharpie and The Hello Project are teaming up so that you can say Hello in all sorts of ways and win Sharpie markers, pens & highlighters!  Stay tuned for more info.

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Atlanta Gets Lost in Corey Barksdale

It’s time for another guest blogger!  This week we’ve got Chelsea Gattung on board.  Chelsea is one of our rockstar E-Marketing interns based in Atlanta, currently attending University of Georgia.  Keep an eye out for this little lady; I see big things to come in her future.  Follow Chelsea on Twitter @cgatt777.

*Chelsea Fun Fact: She can’t resist a good rap song found on YouTube, particularly ones that mention Sharpie.

 

Lost in Creation: Sharpie Artist, Corey Barksdale

The Atlanta artist, Corey Barksdale, pours his emotions into every stroke–taking his audience with him on a powerfully, passionate story on canvas.

Barksdale’s artistic passion derives from a family of artists. His mother and grandmother both exposed him to color and form at an early age and it was destined he, too, would join the family ranks.

The Nashville-bred, Atlanta-native graduated from the Atlanta College of Art in 2004 where abstract expressionists and mainstream artists like Jasper Johns, Clifford Still, and William deKooning influenced his creations. Barksdale also developed an admiration for the African American heritage and this theme can be seen throughout much of his work, depicting the love and strength within the community.

This experimental artist started using Sharpie markers in an efficient attempt to speed up the beginning stages of his pieces, but he quickly “uncapped” the unlimited possibilities of Sharpie markers as they effortlessly added definition to his acrylic paintings. His bold pieces have been showcased all over Georgia and he’s even done live performance art at Park Tavern and Atlanta’s Dogwood Festival (just to name a few). Imagine having art being created before you at your next event—he’ll do it!

After coming across his YouTube videos and colorful artwork, I jumped at the chance to interview Barksdale about using Sharpie Permanent Markers as an art medium and the passion behind his creations!

Read on for the complete interview with an imaginative, southern artist and his felt tip friend!

How did you get started as an artist?

As a child I drew non-stop. My mother would bring home hundreds of sheets of paper from her job and she use to ask my sister and I to fill up the pages with drawings and stories. So at a young age I developed a determination and passion for the creative process and artistic expression. I use to draw countless drawings, especially when school was out for the summer. 

Tell us a little about your genre. How would you describe your style? What makes your work stand out from the rest?

I incorporate a collage or assemblage effect in many of my art creations. Utilizing pasted images of city buildings, and abstract shapes are important elements in my art. The majority of my paintings have an apparent medium of acrylic paint and Sharpie markers, which are usually applied in bold colorful painterly strokes onto the canvas. Many people are attracted to the texture created by these mediums.

 Sharpie does not enocurage the use of Sharpie marker on skin.

What is one of your favorite exhibitions or events you have been involved in? What made this particular one stand out to you? Was it the specific pieces you showcased, the reactions received from attendees, or something else?

The Art Papers Art Auction is one of Atlanta’s signature visual art events that I have been fortunate to participate in. The event features many of the southeastern United States’ cutting-edge, established and emerging, fine artists.

What goes through your mind when you see people looking at your art? Is there a certain reaction you want to elicit?

I would like viewers of my artwork to experience what ever emotion or feeling I had at the time of producing the work of art. The facial expressions and gestures of characters in my paintings usually tell a story and let the viewer understand my emotion during the creative process. Usually I want to elicit a feeling of powerfulness positivity and endless possibilities

How did you come to use Sharpie markers in your work? Do you prefer using a certain type of Sharpie marker?

Approximately ten years ago I was trying to think of a way to speed up my art process. That’s where Sharpie markers came in. In stead of developing my sketch and first layer with paint I used Sharpie markers to create the basic outline and general form of whatever piece I created. As I continued to use Sharpie over a period of years I found out that the possibilities of the markers are limitless. Besides using the markers for the general form I also discovered that they could be used to define and refine my painting in the final stages of the process. I was able to incorporate the markers with acrylic paint effortlessly.

What about Sharpie markers made you incorporate them as a medium in your art process? Is it the variety of tip sizes, colors, other? Please describe how you use Sharpie as an art tool.

I enjoy the ease of using the markers. They go onto the canvas or wood surface with no problem. Once applied to the surface the markers give an opaque mark that is solid and bold, not watered-down or weak. The medium also resists fading over a period of time.

What other mediums, if any, do you wish to create with in the future? Do you have any comical experiences while trying a new medium?

Other mediums that I create with are acrylic paint, charcoal, and encaustic paint. Various forms of art and various mediums suit my style of art considering I like the challenge of mastering new mediums annually.

Tell us, what excites you about creating art?

Creating art is the ultimate form of expression available. Having the ability to create a picture of beauty where there was previously nothing at all gives me the ultimate satisfaction. When creating art all of my worries and anxieties are nonexistent. The hustle, bustle, and drama of city life become a distant thought. Creating can take you to a place that you previously thought impossible.

Take a look at all the ways Corey Barksdale Uncaps What’s Inside: www.coreybarksdale.com

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ATL Take Over with Artist, Mark Boomershine

Here's Caitlin!

Sharpie’s Atlanta Interns are taking over the Sharpie Blog today!  Caitlin Peterson (@cbarrettp) and Chelsea Gattung (@cgatt777) are two smart, sassy and quick-witted young ladies who have been working hard for us all summer long.  We thought it would be fun to put their blogging skills to the test and give them a chance to take over the Sharpie blog.  

Today, Caitlin has put together an amazing interview featuring an Atlanta-based artist with a knack for Sharpie Paint Markers, which I’m sure will knock your socks off!  So there you have it, now, take it away Caitlin…  

 

Ready to “Get hit with a Sharpie?”

 

…Because that’s exactly what Atlanta artist Mark Boomershine does to every painting, adding his own flare and style to iconic images eliciting a new smile, laugh or thoughtful pause to every piece.   

 Using Oil-Based Sharpie Paint Markers to add that little something extra to every piece, whether with revealing words or finishing highlights; he creates a look that sets his stuff apart from the rest.    

Boomershine has always harbored a passion for art, carving his own path to fuel his creativity and fashion the stories that are told through his art.  After completing his studies in art and business at the University of Alabama (as a Georgia Bulldawg I’ll try not to hold it against him) he explored a variety of different avenues, including life as a salesman, entrepreneur and inventor, before recently deciding to “Uncap” his craft full-time.  

 His unique style mixes text and imagery using a simplistic, color-block portraiture technique that is made powerful by the words spoken by and about the subject. Staying true to his roots, he honors his inspirations while redefining the original, creating his incredible and individualistic pop art.   

Bandit

Tonto

His cool southern charm and collaborative style has warranted some rightful attention and placed him within the pages of The Atlanta Magazine and The Atlanta Journal – Constitution.  His piece, “The Real Man Behind the Mask,” a portrayal of the Native American hero, Tonto, from The Lone Ranger television series, resides alongside the art of greats like Andy Warhol and Steve Penley in the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, Georgia.  There the unique works hang in the Contemporary collection in the American West Gallery.  

 Boomershine has said that his work isn’t complete without a little Sharpie love… and we’re OK with that! So if you’re ready to “get hit” read on and check out the complete interview with one of the coolest artists coming out of the Southern city.  

How did you get started as an artist?  

I have always been into art. In fact my art probably caused my not-so-stellar grades in every schooling before college. I was drawing or painting for hours upstairs when I should have been studying History or Math! I excelled in Advanced Placement art in high school, and I parlayed that into a minor in Studio Art at the University of Alabama (I majored in Business Management – how about that for left brain/right brain education). I later became my own art and marketing department as an entrepreneur and inventor because I was too cheap to hire anyone else. I have made art an integral part of my life. I have come to a place in my life where I can now make my art my single focus and my full time occupation. I call it throwing caution to the wind and going for the “Art Gusto”! 

My style

Tell us a little about your genre. How would you describe your style? What makes your work stand out from the rest?  

I fall into the Pop genre. My style is very bold use of color, design and composition with a fun play on words or strong use of text to make my art more dimensional. I feel my smart use of words makes my art have a layer that causes the viewer to stop and read things, which in turn means the viewer is spending more time interacting with the piece itself. I try and make my art relational.  

What is one of your favorite exhibitions or events you have been involved in? Why? I recently worked with BMW and a local BMW dealership to promote the latest 5 Series model. The cool part was that I was given a vintage 1986 325 BMW to paint as a rolling canvas. I painted the car in my garage, which I converted into a car-painting studio. For the show we turned the dealership showroom into a great looking gallery of 9 pieces of my art, one hand painted car, and some beautiful and shiny new BMW’s. Who would have thought a contemporary styled BMW dealership could turn into a hot looking art gallery?  (watch video below to see Mark working on the car in action) 

    

Art Car

 What goes through your mind when you see people looking at your art? Is there a certain reaction you want to elicit? What do you want people take from your art? I have to admit it is a little weird. You are exposing yourself. Your talents, your thoughts, and not to mention your hours of work that went into the piece. However, I relish the viewing of my pieces. I am in the spotlight for that moment in time and I like it. If I can elicit a smile, a chuckle, or even an outright laugh I am happy with that kind of reaction. Of course a swoon of amazement and unabashed praise is always welcome as well! Ha! I want people to take away the feeling that they have seen something original when they see my art. I want to take familiar people, objects, places, or animals and combine them with a twist in the form of text that makes the piece original in itself.  

  

 Being from, and living in Atlanta, how has the city inspired you? Does Atlanta art have a style all its own? What else serves as your inspiration? First of all, I love being from Atlanta. It is a perfect combination of Southern nostalgia and charm with a contemporary urban twist. I feel the city has inspired me by its wit and charm. I think a lot of my fun play on words may come from that subtle humor that a true Southerner can put into just a word or two. As far as my look, I think it lends itself to the more urban side of Atlanta. I have also traveled the world extensively and I feel I try and bring in some aspects of the classic European masters with the cutting edge pop artist of recent times.  

Wonder Woman

 Why did you want to incorporate Sharpie markers into your art process? Sharpie has always been by “go to” tool. As a youngster I would use them for model airplanes, and homemade toys. As an entrepreneur inventor I would use them to mark up samples of prototype models. So when I became a full time artist I naturally went to Sharpie products as a tool I wanted to use in my art. The colors available, specifically in the paint marker area, are perfect for my needs. I use every size tip available. From the broad chisel to the extra fine tip – I use them all! I could not do the monotonous lettering of some of my pieces with out the Sharpie Paint Marker. They allow for ultimate control of the medium and I trust the adhesion to the media. I specifically use the Sharpie Paint Marker in my lettering of text. I start by a light guide layer that is printed on the canvas. As the painting progresses I then go over the light guide with the paint marker. Sometimes I spend nearly 5 hours on the lettering on say a 36”x36” piece. Monotonous, but oh so effective. A few months ago I picked up a light blue fine tipped Sharpie Paint Marker and went crazy highlighting some elements of the painting. I absolutely loved the look! I now consider my paintings unfinished until I hit them with my Sharpie. Then my painting REALLY comes alive and I consider the piece ready for display.  

McQueen

Martini Curve

 Why do you feel the Oil Based Sharpie Paint Markers work best for the highlighting work that you do within your art? How do they enhance your work & where do you find them most useful? There is no product on the market that gives as good of paint coverage with one swipe nor the color selection as Sharpie’s Paint Marker. Once the paint is flowing through the tip the color applies in such a fluid and controlled manner they are a joy to work with. The color also stays very vibrant. Even when applied on top of other paints. Sharpies make my works come to life in the manner in which I use the pens to add highlights to areas of paintings in the form of accent lines. As mentioned above I also use the Sharpie Paint Marker with the extra fine point to do my meticulous lettering on the background of my paintings.  

Sharpie’s tagline is “Uncap What’s Inside!”  Does this apply to your work and if so, how? For sure! I mean c’mon…I turned an old BMW into a rolling canvas with the help of Sharpie! 

  

http://markboomershine.com

  

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Swatch Out! It’s Matthew Langille

Thank goodness!  A New Jersey native who puts Snooki to shame (if she hasn’t achieved this on her own yet..) and lays “The Situation” to rest.  He’s not orange and I’m almost positive his hair isn’t styled to resemble Sonic the Hedgehog… 

Who is this god sent, you ask?  

Why he is none other than Matthew Langille, an amazing graphic artist and designer whose work you most likely already know, own and love!  Langille’s comical, yet simplistic artistic style is leading him in a direction that, though he may not have originally set out for, is definitely leading him toward some pretty amazing places!  In fact, you’ll learn from Matthew himself, how his eye for style (or the ladies) steered him toward the path he’s on today!

Having already designed for several fashion houses & design firms, featured in numerous publications, working globally and owning designs adored by A-listers, you may wonder how someone can build such notoriety and achieve great success.  Well this artist has the answer…and I think that you will come to find that a lot of Langille’s success has to do with being comfortable & having confidence in his own talent and personal style.

Tell me all about you!  I was born and raised in New Jersey.  Growing up, my mother was an amazing art teacher and today is a recognized fiber artist, well received all over the country.  My grandfather, Harold Krisel was an brilliant architect and abstract painter.  His work can be found in museums across the country, including the MoMa, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Guggenheim, Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Chicago Institute, to name a few.  Finally, my brother, Jesse Langille, is a wonderful painter, living in Brooklyn.  As you can see, I grew up in a very artistic family, always around art and have been able to see some of the most amazing museums around the world.

At age 11, I began glassblowing and continued with this medium until my early college years – the whole time not drawing too much.  I was a sophomore in college when I noticed that all of the cute girls were in the printmaking and design department.  So, I swiftly changed gears and began studying these mediums…where all the cute girls were! haha  (Right Matthew, I’m sure you got a lot of “studying” done ;) )

I also love to watch movies, listen to my vinyl records, enjoy a beer or glass of wine and eating well.  And of course, create artwork.

Jock Jams Vol. 97 album cover?

Smart woman, your wife

Especially downtown, during rush hour

...Maybe it's the glasses?

Have you always wanted to work in fashion, or did you just sort of find yourself in it?  I really had no intentions of working in the fashion industry - I kind of stumbled into it!  I did drawings for magazines and some amazing fashion designers, such as Marc by Marc Jacobs and the amazing Norma Kamali.  Quickly, it all sort of snowballed from there.  It’s been a nice surprise and I do love my work so much! 

A lot of your work is unlike that I’ve ever seen! Where do you draw inspiration from?  Thanks!  I get inspiration from everyday things – people, animals, art, music, etc.  Most of all though, I think a large aspect of my work has to do with how early I embraced the fact that my drawing technique wasn’t perfect and that it was unlike all of the other “typical illustration work” out there.  I think embracing my style was what has made me successful today.

 Who/what brands have you worked for?  Any favorites?  I have worked for over 75 fashion, design and magazine companies across the globe.  Some of these include: Marc by Marc Jacobs, Little Marc Jacobs, Swatch, Adidas, Havaianas and SIGG. You can see them all on my website and these brands are found just about everywhere. (Pardon the interuption…Matthew, feel free to send any and all Marc Jacobs to my home address)

Langille signing autographs in NYC

Matthew's John Hancock

“I use Sharpies like a painter uses a brush.”

 What is your creation & design process like?   I start with a huge stack of computer paper and I draw with pens and Sharpie markers.  Using these tool doesn’t allow me to erase, so I feel I get a much more unique and gestural line.  I go through A LOT of Sharpies and A LOT of paper (which is all recycled of course : ) haha).  Then I scan the work into the computer, color the designs in and clean them up if need be.

Favorite Sharpie?  I go for the original, Fine Point Sharpie…  and if I stray from that I’ll either go smaller or larger… but really, most often just the normal Sharpie does good by me.  I use Sharpies like a painter uses a brush. I wouldn’t have any lines if I didn’t have Sharpie markers.  I’ve tried other markers out there, so I’m not kissing up….haha….but nothing works for me the way Sharpie does.

So, I’ve spotted several celebrities in your designs!  Who is the one celeb you want to be seen in a “Matthew Langille original”?  Well there are many of course…. All of them! haha.  Jay Z would be a trip!  I think he’d rock one of my designs well. On the other end of the spectrum, I’d love to see some of my Hollywood crushes wearing my stuff too.  Like Drew Barrymore, Anne Hathaway, and Natalie Portman, to name only a few haha!

Paris Hilton in a Matthew Langille Print Dress for Amanda Uprichard

Proudest accomplishment to date?  My proudest accomplishment to date was designing 3 Swatch watches for the CreArt Artist collection, released July ‘09.  I was humbled to be chosen to do work for Swatch’s artist collection.  A few others who have created designs for the Swatch artist collections include: Keith Haring, Vivienne Westwood, Helmut Newton, Annie Leibovitz, Spike Lee, Yoko Ono, Kiki Picasso, Christian Lacroix, and many many other amazing artists.  It was an honor and still is, to be in such great company.

Are you currently working on anything that you can tell us about?!  Sure!  I have recently released three wall decals for Surface Graphics and I am designing a collection of women’s and men’s jeans for Reco Jeans, a denim line that is eco-conscious and uses recycled denim.  I also have created two designs for wallets for JFold which will be out soon. So stay tuned to my website and blog!

Maxim Magazine, Mexico

Numero Tokyo Magazine

Do you have any advice for other young artists?  Of course…  Follow your instincts with your art.  Don’t change to be like someone else.  Network, network, network…..No one says that people are going to come to you and become interested in your work. So I suggest that young artists need to market themselves and never take no for an answer.

What do you hope for in 2010?  I hope for more great projects and fun collaborations to come my way. And of course health and happiness.

    Matthew Langille, ladies and gentlemen! 

Isn’t he great!?   Langille is all over the place these days, not only can you wear his designs and buy them just about everywhere, he is also right at your fingers tips!  Check out his sites and chat with him directly!

… and shout out to Jay-Z — Can you strap on one of Matthew’s Swatch watches? Cool. Thanks Hova.