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Take a Picture, It’ll Last Longer

We’ve got love.  We’ve got hate.  We’ve got the good, the bad & the ugly presents.  What’s the next hot topic for the debate?! How about

Valentine’s Day Memories!  

Memories are like pictures for your soul.  When you think back to that moment, you can see every detail, hear every sound, smell every scent, taste every last morsel —  it all comes rushing back to you in an instant just with one thought. Valentine’s Day is tough though.  There is a lot of pressure to make this one day memorable, a  day that will be remembered and cherished forever.  Do we achieve that every year? Maybe. Maybe not.  Either way a memory is made and we add yet another snapshot to our internal photo album.

So what’s the best or worst  memory you have of Valentine’s Day?  Every one has some story to tell, what’s yours?  Maybe you had that perfect Valentine’s Day that you will never forget.  Maybe you had a magical night with your sweetheart and to this day it was the best night of your life!  Did you get a bad rash from the “roses” your lover bought you?  Did you bloat like a blowfish post-VDay chocolates?  Tell us about your VDay memory –  we want to know!

When we were downtown we got a few people chatting about their VDay memories -  here are new videos from the on-street interviews:

Join the conversation on Facebook where you can comment and upload your own videos and pics!   We will be posting more videos through the 14th so check back to see fi you or any of your friends are posted!

Don’t forget, all the videos are uploaded on Youtube

♥ ♥ ♥

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Know the Facts! 1st Installment

tory burchDesigner: Tory Burch

Tory Burch prides itself on being an attainable, luxury, lifestyle brand defined by classic American sportswear with an eclectic sensibility.  The line embodies the personal style and spirit of its co-founder and creative director, Tory Burch.  Opening her first flagship store in February 2004 in NYC, Burch designed the boutique to feel more like a room in her own home versusa traditional retail store, with key design elements to include orange lacquer doors, mirrored walls, and Lucite fixtures.  Graphic prints, bold colors and ethnic detailing are all signatures of the brand.

Burch finds draws creative influence from her mother and father’s unique personal styles, in addition to art, photography, films travel, and the work of interior designer David Hicks.  Tory Burch is available at 16 free-standing Tory Burch boutiques across the US, over 400 select department and specialty stores worldwide, and online at www.toryburch.com. 

This information was acquired from the brand’s website.  For more info on the fabulous designer and her line please visit www.toryburch.com.

tracyreeseDesigner: Tracy Reese

This Parsons School of Design alum has apprenticed under Martine Sitbon, worked for the small contemporary firm, Arlequin, and has worked at some of the industry’s top fashion houses, including Perry Ellis where she was the design director for Women’s Portfolio.  In Spring 1998, Reese launched her collection.  Known for her distinctive look of ultra-feminine pieces layered with intelligent nostalgia, charm and luxury, the line is perfect for the modern woman who simply loves to be a girl.  That same year, the designer introduced her second line, plenty by Tracy Reese, a bohemian, ethnic-inspired collection that is of-the-moment, yet never trendy. The collection is both eclectic and adventurous, featuring Reese’s signature detailing.

Since their initial launches, both Tracy Reese and plenty by Tracy Reese have expanded into several brand categories. Tracy Reese footwear, handbags and belts feature ladylike silhouettes in luxurious leathers with exquisite detailing; while the whimsical, feminine and eclectic, plenty brand now includes a home collection, candles, cosmetic cases and handbags. Reese added a third collection to her line up, frock!, comprised of fun and flirty occasion dresses that easily transition from day to evening.

Bright colors, unique prints and intricate patterns define Tracy Reese, plenty and frock!  All three lines! are sold nationwide in top department stores and specialty boutiques including Bergdorf Goodman, Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Anthropologie and Scoop as well as retailers throughout Europe and Asia.

This information was acquired from the brand’s website.  For more info on the wonderful designer and her line please visit www.tracyreese.com.

logo-CityOfHope1City of Hope Fact

City of Hope is one of only 40 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers nationwide and a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. An independent biomedical research, treatment and education institution, City of Hope is a leader in the fight to conquer cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS and other life-threatening diseases.

Visit www.cityofhope.org for more details on how you can get involved and more information about the organization.

Breast Cancer Fact

Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer in women and the second most common cause of cancer death in women in the U.S. between the ages of 45 and 55. Although breast cancer in women is a common form of cancer, male breast cancer does occur and accounts for about 1% of all cancer deaths in men.

Auction Details

Visit www.sharpieuncapped.com to participate in the auction and bid on designers’ Sharpie art work  and be sure to read Works of Art From the Heart for more info on the auction! 

 

Uncap What’s Inside!

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Cup ‘o Sharpie

sharpie-win-win-inkterns-024

It’s Stephanie’s turn!  Stephanie Williams is a Sharpie INKtern and this is her first post on the Sharpie blog.  She just graduated from DePaul U but is heading back in the fall for her masters.  She runs track at DePaul and has set all sorts of records.   For the record, Stephanie is a rock star intern…read her rock star post… 

Meet… Cheeming Boey 

Boey talks about his artwork in his Newport Beach apartment.

Boey talks about his artwork in his Newport Beach apartment.

“ The styrofoam cup itself represents the pop culture we live in, and in some ways, is the epitome of 21st century technology.”

It’s a product we see every day. The styrofoam cup.  Parties, barbecues and picnics are all places we use them and then we just…throw them away. But not 31-year-old artist and animator, Cheeming Boey of Newport Beach, California; he creates art. Armed with a black Sharpie Pen, Boey draws images on cups that include intricate waves, birds and scenes of his life from Malaysia to Orange County.

Boey shows one side of a cup entitled, "Run Baby Run."

Boey shows one side of a cup entitled, "Run Baby Run."

 Q: Tell me a little about your business.

Boey: I draw on Styrofoam coffee cups. 

Q: How did you come up with the idea?

 Boey: I had no paper while I was craving to sketch one day outside a coffee shop, saw a cup on top of a trash can, took it and started drawing on the surface. I had forgotten how well ink flows on the Styrofoam surface. Its got a completely different feel from paper. Initially it was just with a ball point pen, I later moved to sharpie because I had some sharpies on my desk at work.

Equipped with his Sharpie.

Equipped with his Sharpie.

 Q: How are Sharpie markers incorporated?

 Boey: They are primarily what I use to draw on my cups now. I only use one fine point sharpie for all my line works. I know there’re several sizes, but part of the challenge I want to tackle is achieving different strokes with one pen.

 Q: What benefit do you think this offers and to who?

His "mistake" cups are the ones he drinks out of.

His "mistake" cups are the ones he drinks out of.

 Boey: People tend to think that drawings and paintings are always on canvases or paper.

I would like others to see that anything can be used as a canvas. You must have tried drawing with fries using ketchup, right? Why can’t that be serious art?

 It’s not what you draw on all the time; it’s the idea on it, or behind it. If the KFC recipe was sold on a napkin for a million bucks, I don’t think people are gonna say, “Nah, I don’t want it…it’s on a napkin.”

 The styrofoam cup itself represents the pop culture we live in, and in some ways, is the epitome of 21st century technology. Yet it is often overlooked, and when it ever brings attention, it stands for everything negative.

Showing his love for waves.

Showing his love for waves.

I believe there’s beauty in everything, including what we consider imperfect. I embrace the fact that it isn’t perfect. Sort of like the Wabi-Sabi movement in Japan.

 The fact that it is “cheap” and “disposable” makes it an unlikely subject for anything “special”. But it is that reason that I decided to draw on them. It also keeps one cup off the streets, if people are worried about Styrofoam waste.

 Q: Why are Sharpie markers a good fit for this? 

 Boey: Like how anything can be a canvas, I believe anything could be a tool as well.People are always surprised when I tell them I drew with a sharpie. A lot of them think it is liquid acrylics, or other fancy pens. “No, it’s with a sharpie.”The sharpie has a nice tip and it has a good consistent ink flow. It is also cheap. And cheap doesn’t mean bad.

 Q:  Tell us about some of your favorite designs.  Why do they resonate with you?

 Boey: I like the ones that are more personal, like a dining experience with a friend over sake and stories. I also like waves; hence a lot of my cups have a spaghetti-like, wave motif to it. One of my favorite Japanese artists who has influenced me heavily is Hokusai, and I think a lot about how he draws his waves when I draw mine.

 Q: What is the longest amount of time you have spent on one cup?

His cups sell for hundreds.

His cups sell for hundreds.

 Boey: 3 months. I don’t do initial drafts on the cups, so what you see is on the final product is the first pass. It takes forever to work on an elaborate piece because my next line could completely ruin the composition. Or I get nervous about drawing certain shapes. Or poses.

So sometimes I take hours to figure out the composition in my head, sometimes I don’t come back to it for months.

I have to also make sure the foam cups are absolutely lint/ hair free. They charge up easily and tiny hairs or lint can stick to it. And when the fine point on the sharpie catches one of these hairs, a thin line can suddenly become a broad stroke. Terrible.

More designs.

More designs.

Q:Do you think you’ll expand the idea to other items?

Boey: Sure. Anything is possible right?

Q: Anything else you’d like to add that I didn’t ask?

 Boey:I could use some free sharpies. I go thru about 1 every 2 days.

 

 View more of Cheeming Boey’s art at: http://rectangletriangle.googlepages.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/13895571@N04/3667583242/in/set-72157614580046629/

Contact Boey:rectangletriangle@gmail.com