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Sharpie Prom

 

"A lot of people didn’t believe me that the dress and suit were done in Sharpie, I guess the idea sounded a little crazy to some people. Others thought we bought them, but little did they know both the dress and the suit started out completely white."

“A lot of people didn’t believe me that the dress and suit were done in Sharpie, I guess the idea sounded a little crazy to some people. Others thought we bought them, but little did they know both the dress and the suit started out completely white.”

HEguys and girls! With the new school season about to start… who says it’s too early to start planning PROM!?? You only have one right? Well, see how Amy decked out her prom outfit… and she probably saved a fortune doing it.

Q: How did you come up with the idea to make outfits for prom?

Ekbom: It was actually my boyfriend who made me think of it. He wanted to wear a suit that looked absolutely ridiculous, and we already owned a white suit and a white dress, so I figured we could save some money and look extra unique by having matching outfits. 

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Q: How big is your Sharpie collection?

Ekbom: I have a good sized box full of Sharpie markers, and Sharpie products only. During the process of making the dress & suit I was constantly running out of black markers, so over the period of time that I was making them, I probably bought a pack of black markers every other week.  Sharpie was the only product I would trust with a project like this. The colors are bold and vibrant, and from my experience of using them they never run.  I wanted to use something that I knew I could trust to look good, and last long. There was really no second guessing myself with what I was going to use.

Q: What specific Sharpie tools do you use? Markers, pens, etc.
Ekbom:
I use the standard fine point permanent markers, ultra-fine point markers, retractable markers, water based (and a few oil based) paint markers, and my personal favorite Sharpie Accent highlighter liquid pens. 

Before and After

Before and After

What a date!

What a date!

Look at those designs. Look at those designs.

sleeve

Q:How long does it take you to make an outfit (on average)?
Ekbom:
For this particular project, I worked on and off from the time I found out the date of prom. Overall it took about 2 or 3 months to complete. Although it could have been a shorter amount of time if I wasn’t also busy with school work.

Q: What’s your favorite outfit/piece of the outfit?
Ekbom:
My favorite piece out of the whole set was the dress, not only because I got to wear it but it was a bigger canvas and the material was a lot easier to draw on.

Q: What were people’s reactions after seeing your Sharpie prom outfits? 
Ekbom:
A lot of people didn’t believe me that the dress and suit were done in Sharpie, I guess the idea of that sounded a little crazy to some people. Others thought we bought them, but little did they know both the dress and the suit started out completely white.

tim 018Q: Have you had any requests from friends or family to make their prom outfits?
Ekbom:
I have actually had no requests for another prom outfit, but people ask me all the time if I will draw on other articles of clothing, or just draw them a picture.

Q: Do you draw on other “everyday clothing” or was this a one time thing?
Ekbom:
I suppose this all started when I drew on a hat (worn in the picture) for my boyfriend. Since then I’ve used Sharpie to draw on 4 different hats, the prom outfits, and pair of pants and 2 shirts. I’m hoping to get a pair of white Converse and draw on them as well.

Learn more about Amy! www.myspace.com/cool_kid_with_amyspace 

Amy’s Contact: xoamyox38@yahoo.com

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Let’s get wiggy with it

Sharpie Dyed Wig on Jaina Solo

Well, well, well.  Another day.  Another first.  Wigs.  Dyed wigs.  Wigs dyed with Sharpie.  Who knew? 

JonelB on Twitter gave me the heads up (ha!  Heads up.  Get it?!?!)  Seems there’s a whole world of people out there using Sharpies to custom dye wigs.  Jonel pointed me to Cosplay.com and one of their forum threads where you can pick up everything you need to know about how to dye a wig to your particular specifications.  On the thread was Jaina Solo who offered a great how-to:  

 

 I just dyed a wig yesterday with sharpies! I think there are two ways you can do it:

1) Take a sharpie, grab some hair, and start coloring. This is a very long and tedious process and takes a lot of sharpies depending on how long the wig is, but the results look very nice. Once you are done sharpieing the whole wig, rinse it in cold water until the water is clear, then let the wig dry completely. If you see any spots that you missed, go back and sharpie it and then rinse the wig again.

2) Harvest the sharpie ink well and mix it with alcohol so you can dunk or spray the wig with it. This can be a messy process, and the alcohol can cause the ink to streak if you’re not careful, but it’s much faster than having to hand-color an entire wig, especially if it’s a long one. This is the process I used, and what I did was I cracked open a sharpie, took out the ink well and placed it into a jar of alcohol. At first, I just shook the bottle of alchohol every once in a while to get the ink out of the well and into the alchohol, but I noticed that this was taking a long time and wasn’t getting all the ink out, so instead I grabbed the ink well and squeezed out as much ink as I could into the alcohol. It was messy but it worked great. Since I was dying a long wig very dark, I used an entire liter of 70% alcohol mixed with 10 sharpies. I then dunked the wig into the mixture (by this time I was using a bowl), and I let the wig dry. However, when letting the wig dry, do NOT hang it on a wig head or by its scalp–the alcohol dripping off with strip the ink off, leaving a very irregular dye job. Lay the wig on a drop cloth on the ground somewhere flat, so that the alcohol can’t drip off the wig and take ink with it!

And just when you think you couldn’t possibly know another thing about the universe because you already know everything, along comes Cosplay.  What is Cosplay, you may be wondering?  Me too.  Here’s the Wikipedia explanation.  Here’s my short outtake: 

Cosplay players

Short for “costume play,” Cosplay is a type of performance art whose participants outfit themselves, with often-elaborate costumes and accessories, as a specific character. Characters are usually sourced in various Japanese and East Asian media, including manga, anime, tokusatsu, comic books, graphic novels, video games, and fantasy movies. Other sources include performers from J-pop, J-rock, Visual Kei, fantasy music stories (such as stories by the band Sound Horizon), novels, and objects from cyberspace or the real world that are unique and dramatic (especially if they have or can be given an anthropomorphic form).